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25 Jun

Accidental Exposure to Addiction Medication

A treatment for opioid addiction is injuring kids

Health News Results - 159

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Experts say 51 children died in hot cars in the United States last year -- the highest toll on record.

The previous single-year high was 49 deaths in 2010, the National Safety Council (NSC) said.

With another hot summer approaching, the safety council has issued free online training. The course, called "Children in Hot Cars," expla...

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 100 kids a day are rushed to U.S. emergency rooms after accidentally swallowing a toy piece, battery, magnet or other foreign object, according to new research.

That's almost twice as many as in the mid-1990s.

"The sheer number of these injuries is cause for concern," said Dr. Danielle Orsagh-Yentis, lead author of the study p...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living near a major road may significantly increase a young child's risk of developmental delays, a new study claims.

It also found that children whose mothers were exposed during pregnancy to high levels of specific types of traffic-related air pollution had slightly higher odds of developmental delays.

"Our results suggest that...

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play Sleeper has been linked to dozens of infant deaths and should be recalled immediately, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said Tuesday.

The inclined sleeper has been associated with 32 sleep-related infant deaths, according to a new Consumer Reports analysis.

Along with urging a recall by the...

WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Far too little is known about the safety of medication use during breastfeeding -- and it's time to get some answers, experts say.

It's a critical gap, given that breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for babies -- and moms are encouraged to do it. But when a woman has questions about the safety of any medication she's taking, docto...

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With concern over concussion dangers rising, most U.S. parents now say that they would support bans on tackling in youth football, a new survey shows.

Researchers found that of more than 1,000 parents in a national sample, 60 percent were in favor of age restrictions on tackling. Another quarter were in the "maybe" camp.

The study, ...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's been known for some time that when one parent is absent because of death, divorce or separation, kids are at higher risk for drinking alcohol and smoking than their counterparts in a two-parent household.

A study done in the United Kingdom found that these risks rise even before the teen years, typically viewed as the time for rebellious...

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Gun-related deaths among school-age children in the United States are increasing at alarming rates, researchers report.

In 2017, gun violence claimed more 5- to 18-year-olds than police officers or active-duty members of the U.S. military, according to a chilling new study led by investigators from Florida Atlantic University.

"It ...

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drowning can be swift and silent, making it a leading cause of accidental death among children.

To help parents protect their kids in and around the water, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its water safety recommendations.

Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental injury-related death among 5- to 19-year-...

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking during pregnancy is never a good idea, but new research shows it might double the risk of a baby dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

"Any maternal smoking during pregnancy -- even just one cigarette a day -- doubles the risk of sudden unexpected infant death [SUID, another term for unexplained infant deaths]," said lead r...

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children who live in homes with vinyl flooring and flame-retardant furniture have higher levels of potentially harmful chemicals in their blood or urine, researchers have found.

The new study included 203 children from 190 families who were tested for these chemicals -- so-called semi-volatile organic compounds (or SVOCs) -- in their blood...

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Crippling brain injury from football can start early, even among high school players, a new study suggests.

And its effects can last over time, even without additional head impacts, researchers report.

Football players can develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after playing high school football, although higher rates of CTE a...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Glass-fronted gas fireplaces can pose a serious risk to young children, an emergency room physician warns.

Dr. Michael Gittelman, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, cited the case of a 3-year-old boy whose hand was badly burned when he touched the glass door of the family's gas fireplace.

"Young children, like the bo...

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are given general anesthesia for an hour are unlikely to suffer harm, but the safety of longer and repeated exposure remains unknown, a new study says.

Among more than 700 infants in seven countries, the researchers didn't find any measurable neurodevelopmental or behavioral problems up to the age of 5.

"Nearly half the g...

THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Measles outbreaks across the United States -- including one in Washington state where 50 cases have now been identified -- have again shone the spotlight on parents who resist getting kids vaccinated.

These outbreaks are a clear sign of the fraying of "herd immunity," the overall protection found when a large majority of a population has beco...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bouncing around at a trampoline park can be great fun, but a new study warns it can also be an invitation to sprains, strains and broken bones.

Nationwide, more than 100,000 emergency room visits were related to trampoline injuries in 2014, according to the latest data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Injuries that o...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More U.S. families with young children are buying handguns -- and that might help explain a recent spike in firearm deaths, a new study suggests.

Government figures show that after years of decline, gun-related deaths among U.S. children under age 5 have been on the upswing. Between 2006 and 2016, the rate nearly doubled -- from 0.36 deaths f...

TUESDAY, Jan. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With youth winter sports in full swing, it's important for coaches and parents to know the signs of a concussion, a sports medicine doctor says.

"Because concussion can affect thinking, the person who suffered the injury might not realize there is a problem," said Dr. Kathryn Gloyer, a primary sports medicine physician with Penn State Health i...

FRIDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A horrific 2011 Christmas Day fire killed five people, including three young sisters, in their Stamford, Conn., home.

The tragedy -- blamed on improper disposal of fireplace ashes -- is a reminder that fire safety is one of the best Christmas gifts you can give your family.

"Practicing winter holiday safety is extremely important," s...

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teething jewelry products, such as necklaces, pose significant safety risks and have been tied to at least one baby's death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Potential threats include choking, strangulation, injury to the mouth and infection. These products should not be used to relieve teething pain in infants, the agency said.

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking of buying your kid a BB, pellet or paintball gun for Christmas? Don't forget eye protection, the American Academy of Ophthalmology urges.

The number of eye injuries related to so-called "nonpowder guns" are increasing at an alarming rate. In fact, one study published earlier this year found a nearly 170 percent increase in these typ...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Car crashes and guns have been the two leading killers of kids in the United States for decades, and deaths from both causes are on the rise.

More children have been dying from motor vehicle crashes and firearms injuries since 2013, a new report shows.

Car crashes accounted for 20 percent of all deaths for children aged 19 and you...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sending report cards home from school on Fridays is linked to a surge in child abuse, a new study finds.

"It's a pretty astonishing finding," said lead study author Melissa Bright, a research scientist with the University of Florida's Anita Zucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studies.

"It's sad, but the good news is there...

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It was a chilly morning in Louisville, so Juvenal Garcia Mora warmed up the car inside the garage before planning to drive his two children to school.

By the next day, all three were dead -- victims of a tragedy that highlights the dangers of carbon monoxide.

Mora, 39, his 3-year-old son, Cruz, and daughter, Mayra, 8, were found unr...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The numbers are alarming.

According to U.S. health officials, more than 200,000 children aged 14 or under are treated each year in emergency departments for playground-related injuries, about 10 percent of which involve "TBIs" -- or traumatic brain injuries.

Modern playground designs help reduce the risk of injury from falls, but they...

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to chemicals found in a wide array of personal care products has been linked to early puberty among girls, a new investigation warns.

The issue centers on specific chemicals including phthalates, parabens and phenols. They're found in an array of products, including perfumes, soaps, shampoos, nail polish, cosmetics, toothpaste, lipsti...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Not all the toys in Santa's sack are safe to play with. Among this year's most dangerous playthings are data-collecting dolls and fidget spinners full of lead, a new report says.

"We should be able to trust that the toys we buy are safe. However, until that's the case, toy buyers need to watch out for common hazards when shopping for children...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are wide variations between states when it comes to child restraint rules for ride-share services such as Lyft and Uber, researchers report.

This can cause uncertainty and confusion for parents and other caregivers. Ride-share vehicles typically don't come with a car seat, and an option to request one is available only in some cities, the...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with summer birthdays, especially those who spend long hours playing on smartphones and tablets, might be at greater risk for vision problems, a new study suggests.

Nearsightedness, also called myopia, is on the rise worldwide. It's what eye doctors call a refractive error, meaning the eyes can't focus light properly. The result: Close ob...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As Mark Barden let go of the hand of his young son, Daniel, and the boy boarded the bus for school on the morning of Dec. 14, 2012, he had no idea it would be the last time he would see his child alive.

Hours later, the 7-year-old lost his life in the horrific mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Twenty children and...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many kids love a quick bowl of instant soup or tasty noodles, but these fast foods cause almost 10,000 scald burns in children each year in the United States, a new study estimates.

What's more, researchers found that two out of every 10 scald burns that send kids to the ER are caused by microwavable instant soup spills.

"We suspect ...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids are safer in states with strict gun laws, a new preliminary study reports.

Researchers found that the stringency of a state's firearm legislation has a direct impact on the number of kids killed by guns.

Twice as many child gun deaths occur in states with the most lenient gun regulation, compared with states where gun laws are s...

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Trick-or-treating is a Halloween tradition that can quickly turn disastrous, with new research showing a more than 40 percent spike in pedestrian deaths on the spooky holiday.

Kids wearing dark costumes, zigzagging across streets and popping out between parked cars are potentially tragic targets for drivers rushing home after work, explained ...

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Does getting a flu shot every year diminish its power to protect children?

Absolutely not, say researchers, who found that last year's shot will not in any way reduce the flu-fighting strength of this year's shot.

The conclusion follows three years spent monitoring flu vaccine effectiveness among nearly 3,400 children aged 2 to 17. T...

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Another study backs up the belief that "breast is best" when it comes to a baby's health.

In the report, Finnish researchers say that breastfeeding appears to protect babies from dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Due to their weak immune systems, more than 200,000 newborns worldwide die each year of infections caused by antibi...

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cardboard baby boxes are gaining fans, but are they as safe as cribs and bassinets?

Experts say no.

Without supporting evidence, "the cardboard baby box should not be promoted as a safe sleeping space, but as only a temporary substitute if nothing else is available," said Peter Blair, a professor at the University of Bristol in Eng...

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For middle school students, witnessing school violence can be as bad as being bullied, new research suggests.

An international team of researchers found that young witnesses face many of the same challenges later on as those who are direct victims of campus violence. Notably, eighth-grade witnesses are at higher risk for social and academic p...

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most children who have mild to moderate reactions to a vaccine can safely receive booster shots, new research suggests.

Canadian scientists found there is a low rate of recurring reactions following subsequent vaccinations. They said their findings should help inform doctors and parents about the safety of immunizations.

"Most patie...

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday launched a new ad campaign aimed at curbing rampant e-cigarette use among American teens.

Just last week, the agency announced a crackdown on companies that make e-cigarettes and stores that sell the products illegally to minors. The companies have 60 days to come up with plans to stop those s...

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite decades of warnings about the hazards of baby walkers, thousands of toddlers still end up in hospital emergency rooms with walker-related injuries, new research shows.

The study reported that more than 230,000 children younger than 15 months old were treated in emergency rooms between 1990 and 2014. More than 10,000 of those youngster...

MONDAY, Sept. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- All children 6 months of age and older should have a flu shot, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says.

A flu shot significantly reduces a child's risk of severe illness and flu-related death, according to the policy statement published online Sept. 3 in the journal Pediatrics.

"The flu virus is common -- and unpredictab...

THURSDAY, Aug. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids should ride in rear-facing car safety seats until they reach the highest height and weight their seat can hold, a leading pediatricians' group now says.

The previous advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics was to stop using a rear-facing seat when a child was 2 years old.

"Fortunately, car seat manufacturers have creat...

MONDAY, Aug. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Whether your kids walk to school, take the bus or ride in a carpool, teaching them some common-sense practices will make for a safer trip, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.

Children who take a school bus should be reminded to wait for it to stop before approaching it. Tell them to walk where they can always see the bus driver; that mean...

SUNDAY, Aug. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As parents send their kids back to school, they need to remember the school day includes the hours before and after classes, a leading pediatrician's group says.

Children in grade school and middle school require supervision, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). An adult should be available to get them ready and off to school...

FRIDAY, Aug. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents should include medical checkups, updated health records and safety training on kids' back-to-school checklists, a group of emergency physicians advises.

"We all know about reading, writing and arithmetic. Let's consider adding a fourth 'R' for parents -- establishing routine healthy behaviors," Dr. Paul Kivela, president of the America...

FRIDAY, Aug. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- HPV vaccination does not hurt teen girls' future fertility, a new study says.

Large studies have called the HPV (human papillomavirus) shot safe, but vaccination rates in the United States are lower than for other shots recommended for teens, such as tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) and meningococcal conjugate.

Parents' ...

THURSDAY, Aug. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Potentially poisonous e-cigarette liquid made by 17 different manufacturers has been sold in packaging that strongly resembles that of candies, cookies and other snacks popular with kids.

And after warnings sent to the companies in May, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Thursday that the respective companies have ceased maki...

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- That wearable oxygen monitor you bought for your baby could be feeding you bad information, researchers report.

Tests of two infant oxygen monitors sold directly to consumers have raised serious concerns about the accuracy of these devices, which are meant to keep an eye on a baby's heart rate and oxygen levels.

But one of the monit...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to what doctors have thought, women who opt to have their labor induced in the 39th week of pregnancy do not face a heightened risk of cesarean section, a new clinical trial finds.

In fact, the study showed, those women were less likely to need a C-section than women who let nature take its course. And there was no evidence labor in...

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Homelessness in infancy poses long-term harms, including greater risk for poor health and development later in childhood, a new study finds.

"We too often refer to 'resiliency' when we talk about children exposed to hardship as infants. We should not mislead ourselves about the very real long-term impacts that are seen," study first author Dr. ...

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Wellness Library Results - 15

With his 2-year-old upstairs taking a nap, Tim Anderson* seized the chance to do some yard work. A few moments later, he was bewildered to find the toddler lying on the lawn, crying inconsolably. That's odd, he thought: How did he get downstairs so fast? Then, to his horror, he noticed a window screen lying beside his son. Alone in his room, the enterprising tot had managed to push out the screen ...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, you want to show him his behavior is unacceptable and must change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages you don't want to send:

Anyone can make mistakes taking medication, but kids are especially vulnerable. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, half of all kids don't take their medicines properly. Of course, no one should expect a 6-year-old to read and follow the instructions on a box of cough syrup or pain reliever. It's up to parents and other caregivers to make sure kids take the right medicines in the rig...

Whether it's a backyard oasis or the gem of the community park, a swimming pool is a great place for summer fun. But it's important to remember that swimming pools can be dangerous, especially for children. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, children ages 1 to 4 are more likely than any other age group to die from accidental drowning. Most of these drownings occur in residential pools, often in ...

If you have toddlers or small children, you may have already poison-proofed your house. If not, the sooner you get started, the better. Children between the ages of 1 and 6 years old are at the highest risk for poisoning because they are mobile, curious, and likely to put almost anything into their mouths. After the introduction of child-safety caps in the 1970s, the number of children's deaths by...

Spend an hour at a playground, and there's a good chance that you'll see a child in tears. As long as kids climb, play tag, and reenact superhero battles, a few bruises and scrapes will be part of the scene. But not all mishaps on the swings, slides, and monkey bars can be fixed with a Band-Aid. According to the National Safety Council, playground injuries send more than 200,000 American children ...

What kind of pacifier should I buy? Find one with a shape your child likes. You may have to experiment a bit before you find something that works. Choose a sturdy one-piece type with a soft nipple and ventilation holes (without them, saliva can collect behind the base, irritating the skin around the mouth and causing a rash). The shield surrounding the nipple should be at least one and a half in...

Why should my child wear a bike helmet? Every year about 350,000 children under the age of 15 are rushed to hospital emergency rooms with injuries from bicycle wrecks -- many of them head injuries that can cause brain damage and life-long disabilities. But these injuries are largely preventable if your child wears a bike helmet, which can reduce the risk by 85 percent, according to the U.S. Cons...

With all the news about contaminated food, is there anything I can do to lower my child's risk? There's good reason to wonder. Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, and other potentially dangerous germs can be transmitted in food, causing illness and sometimes death. Fortunately, a few simple tips on buying, storing, and preparing food can go a long way toward lessening your family's chances of getting ...

The headline in the paper on that August 2001 morning made me recoil. Another young boy had died in a wilderness boot camp -- a victim, like many before him, of abuse at the hands of those in charge of helping him. Tony Haynes, 14, drowned after employees at an unlicensed boot camp in Arizona, run by a group called America's Buffalo Soldiers, stuck him in a bathtub half-conscious and turned on th...

Why does my child need a car safety seat? Motor vehicle accidents are the No. 1 killer of children in the United States. You can reduce the risk by 70 percent simply by properly installing a child's safety seat and using it every time your child rides in a car. Today, car seat use is mandatory in every state, including that first ride home from the hospital. What type of car seat does my child n...

A theme park may seem like the most family-friendly vacation destination, but that's not always the case. Along with the rides, attractions, and cartoon characters come to life, you and your child might well encounter long lines, high temperatures, and frayed nerves. Still, a theme park can be an ideal vacation spot if you both plan your days and stay flexible. Take your cues from your child: If ...

A pill bottle with a skull and crossbones on it sends a universal warning: DANGER. But in plain view in the average home, dozens of items used every day are potentially hazardous. And when young children touch and swallow things that catch their eye -- peppermint pink cleaning fluid or bright red iron pills -- the substances can be fatal. Hundreds of children were dying from poisoning each year ...

How do I know if my child is running a fever? Most pediatricians would agree that your child probably doesn't have a fever unless his temperature is higher than 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The average normal temperature in kids is 98.6 degrees F (37 degrees Celsius), but this varies according to the child, the things he's been doing, and even the time of day. (Children's temperatures tend to rise in ...

How can I make my home safe for my child? Parents worry endlessly about how to protect their children from everything -- from ill-intentioned strangers to random bullets and stray dogs -- but many overlook one of the biggest threats to their children's safety and well-being: their own home. Experts say that children ages 1 to 4 are more likely to be injured by falls, burns, drowning, choking, cut...

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