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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Stroke".

22 Aug

Breastfeeding and Stroke Risk

Breastfeeding may lower woman's risk of stroke later in life

Health News Results - 344

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many aging Americans have the common heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation, or "a-fib." Now comes the sobering news that it might raise their odds for dementia.

The Korean study couldn't prove cause and effect, but researchers noted that the link between a-fib and dementia was found even among people who hadn't suffered a stroke....

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The strong link between brain health and heart health is reinforced in a new study. The research showed that as cardiovascular health falters, so too does thinking and memory.

In one of the largest and longest studies of its kind to date, researchers studied a group of nearly 8,000 people in the United Kingdom. The participants were over 49 y...

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight preschoolers have twice the odds of developing high blood pressure by age 6, putting them at risk of heart attack and stroke later in life.

And those odds begin building as early as age 4, a new study reports.

"The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health pro...

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Looking back, Daniela Leonhardt's first indication something was amiss with her heart happened in December 2010, when she fainted before an Irish dance competition.

At the time, she was 30 years old, the mother of two little boys and in jaw-droppingly good shape. Why would she have thought the dizziness and nausea that fol...

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Can a DNA test predict a person's future heart health? Perhaps, researchers say.

A team of Canadian researchers found that by analyzing a person's entire genome, it might be possible to predict their future heart disease risk.

The so-called "polygenic risk score" analysis looks for key heart disease indicators -- genetic "biomark...

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you dread seeing the doctor and your blood pressure reading always seems to be high at the doctor's office, a new review says you should take those elevated readings seriously.

The problem is called white-coat hypertension (because of doctors' traditional white coats) and it may signal an underlying problem.

The research defined...

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that further confirms the link between type 2 diabetes and stroke, a new study shows that having the blood sugar disease during middle age may boost your risk of having the most common type of stroke later in life.

In addition to a 30% greater chance of an ischemic stroke, the researchers also found that people who had type 2...

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what amounts to a double whammy for those living with HIV, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says these patients face higher heart risks but also major barriers to health care.

Three-quarters of people in the United States with HIV are older than 45 and have significant health problems at earlier ages than people without...

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the U.S., and women make up nearly 60% of all stroke deaths.

Why?

In part, experts say, women may have symptoms subtle enough to be missed or brushed off in the daily juggle of work-life balance. That can lead to delays in getting time-sensitive, lifesaving treatm...

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From cappuccinos to cold brew, coffee is a morning must for many Americans, but is it healthy and how much is too much?

A University of South Australia study suggests a couple of cups to start your day probably won't hurt -- and may even be good for you. But drinking six or more cups of coffee a day can increase your risk of heart disease by up...

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who get many of their meals from packages may have heightened risks of heart disease, stroke and premature death, two large studies suggest.

The findings, published online May 29 in the journal BMJ, are the latest to point the finger at "ultra-processed" foods.

They include not only "junk food" -- like chips, sweets an...

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In yet another sign that electronic cigarettes are far from harmless, a new lab study suggests that vaping damages the cells that line the inside walls of blood vessels and could hasten heart trouble.

Lab-grown endothelial cells were more likely to die off or suffer from impaired function when exposed to e-cigarette vapor, the researchers rep...

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could electrical stimulation of nerves that sit behind your nose help limit the harm done to your brain by a stroke?

New research suggests it's possible. In early experiments, blood flow to the brain was increased by widening undamaged arteries and bypassing the clot. This delivered oxygen-rich blood to threatened areas of the brain.

...

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Bacteria commonly seen in the mouth has been found in the brains of people who have had a stroke, a new study shows.

The Finnish research group behind the new findings has been studying a possible association between bacterial infections and cardiovascular disease for more than 10 years. Their study, published May 23 in the ...

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin or anti-clotting medicines like Plavix won't boost the risk of another stroke if you've already survived a bleeding stroke, a new study suggests.

In fact, they might even help guard against a second brain bleed, the researchers noted.

The findings "are reassuring for survivors of brain hemorrhage who need to take ant...

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Men are more likely than women to develop unstable plaques in their neck arteries, a dangerous condition that can lead to strokes, according to new research that also identified a helpful warning sign for rupture-prone plaques in women.

The preliminary study, presented Thursday at the American Heart Association's Vascular Di...

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Strokes are common but not inevitable. There are ways you can reduce your risk, starting with your blood pressure.

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of permanent disability, said Dr. Gary Bernardini, neurology chair at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Queens.

Most strokes occur when b...

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine if all it took to treat the heart condition atrial fibrillation was clipping a small device to your ear for an hour a day? That futuristic scenario could soon be a reality, according to a new study.

In a small, early trial, the researchers found the device -- which emits a mild electric current -- appears to be effective at controlli...

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For years, many people suffering a stroke have not been able to get a critical drug due to time limits on its use. Now, a new study suggests that treatment time window can be doubled.

Experts said the findings could open up the treatment option for many more stroke victims.

The drug is called tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA. It...

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- At first glance, Anh Vu Sawyer wouldn't appear to be someone at high risk for heart disease or stroke.

But she'd be the first to say looks can be deceiving.

"I have a very low body mass index, but I was surprised to learn that I'm already prediabetic and did have high blood pressure," said Sawyer, executive director ...

SATURDAY, May 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A fainting-related fall that caused nerve damage in his right hand could explain why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills declined later in life, a new paper suggests.

The report, published as the world marks the 500th anniversary of the artist's death, contradicts the common belief that da Vinci's difficulties stemm...

THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Getting a good night's sleep can be difficult for many, but restful slumber can be especially hard for stroke survivors. And although various studies have examined the association, doctors continue to overlook the interplay between sleep disorders and stroke, finds a new report on the issue.

More than 50 percent of stroke sur...

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- There he was, Michael Johnson, once the fastest person ever to run 200 meters, the man who'd been so confident of setting the world record that he stepped onto the Centennial Olympic Stadium track wearing spikes painted gold.

Only now he was wearing a powder-blue patient's gown and leaning into a walker. He'd just finished a...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer treatments save lives, but they can also compromise the heart in the long run. Now, new research shows that many U.S. cardiologists aren't trained to treat this unique group of patients.

Heart disease and cancer are the two main causes of death in the United States, but advances in early detection and treatment of cancer have resulted ...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Imagine getting a simple blood test to help doctors predict your risk for having a heart attack or stroke.

That test exists, and that scenario could become reality, according to a new study.

The test often is used now to help hospital medical staff diagnose heart attacks in people who come in with chest pain or ot...

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women with heart disease aren't heeding exercise guidelines, and that could translate into even more health problems down the road, new research suggests.

"Physical activity is a known, cost-effective prevention strategy for women with and without cardiovascular disease, and our study shows worsening health and financial trends over ...

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics can be lifesaving, but using them over a long period might raise the odds of heart disease and stroke in older women, a new study suggests.

Researchers tracked the health of nearly 36,500 U.S. women over an average follow-up of nearly eight years. During that time, more than a thousand developed heart disease.

The stu...

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke survivors often face limited mobility, which quadruples their odds of osteoporosis, broken bones and falls. But most are never screened for these problems, new research reveals.

"Our study adds to previous research that found despite an increased risk, only a small number of people who have recently had a stroke are tested and treate...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Reading the brain waves that control a person's vocal tract might be the best way to help return a voice to people who've lost their ability to speak, a new study suggests.

A brain-machine interface creates natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a "virtual" vocal tract -- an anatomically detailed computer simu...

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Think breakfast isn't the most important meal of the day?

Think again, say researchers behind a new study that found the risk of heart-related death rises dramatically for folks who skip the morning repast.

Compared to people who always ate breakfast, those who say they never did had a 87% higher odds of dying from heart-relat...

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tighter high blood pressure guidelines for children might better spot those at risk for heart disease in adulthood, a new study suggests.

Compared to 2004 guidelines, the updated 2017 guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the number of children considered to have high blood pressure.

But it wasn't known if the...

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a neighborhood pharmacy shuts down, it could have dire repercussions for heart patients living nearby, new research suggests.

That's because such closures could mean patients skip or stop taking the prescriptions they need to stay healthy and safe, according to a team from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

"These findings ...

THURSDAY, April 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say an experimental stroke drug prevented blood clots without the typical side effect of blood thinners: increased bleeding risk.

Bleeding is a common and potentially dangerous side effect of current anti-clotting drugs used to treat stroke patients. But the new findings suggest that the antiplatelet drug, called ACT017, may be ...

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The death of brain cells may not be as sudden, or as irreversible, as previously believed.

Four hours after a pig's death, Yale scientists restored circulation and revived cellular activity within the dead animal's brain.

The cells of the brain remained viable six hours later, compared with other brains not preserved using the ne...

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's good news for the millions of obese Americans with sleep apnea: Researchers report the use of the CPAP mask may greatly increase their chances for a longer life.

Use of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask was tied to a 62% decline in the odds for death over 11 years of follow-up.

That benefit held even af...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite years of being told that the lower your LDL cholesterol the better, is it possible that levels that are too low might harm you?

Yes, say researchers who now report that women who have excessively low LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels may face a higher risk for a bleeding stroke.

The finding runs counter to government guidel...

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's an upside and a downside to prescribing nursing home residents a long list of medicines, new research confirms.

Taking multiple meds can boost a resident's odds of survival after a heart attack, for example, but it may also lower their ability to safely perform daily activities, researchers reported April 9 in the journal Circulati...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Giving millions of fans some "Satisfaction," Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger is recovering and in good health after undergoing a heart valve procedure in New York City on Thursday.

Jagger is being monitored for any complications that could occur, such as excess bleeding, sources told Billboard.

The 75-year-old rocker u...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion under "Obamacare" may have quickly translated into fewer heart disease deaths among middle-aged Americans, a new study suggests.

In 2014, many U.S. states began expanding their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) -- making more lower-income residents eligible for coverage. It's known that those expanded pro...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Americans face shortages of widely used blood pressure drugs due to contamination with potentially cancer-causing impurities, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday said patients can safely take the tainted drugs in the short term.

As the agency explained, the risk of stroke and other problems from stopping the angiotensin II rec...

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women, a C-section carries a higher risk of severe complications than a vaginal delivery, particularly after age 35, a new study finds.

The researchers said that cesarean deliveries appear to cause an overall 80% increased risk of severe maternal complications when compared with vaginal delivery.

For women 35 or old...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans work in shifts, and new research suggests it's doing no favors for their cardiovascular health.

The Chinese study of more than 320,000 people found that shift workers are at heightened risk for heart disease, and the more years they work shifts, the greater their risk.

Shift work "can earn more profit, but it c...

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Not all Asian-Americans are equally susceptible to the deadly damage of heart disease and stroke, new research suggests.

The risk of premature death is highest among Asian Indian, Filipino and Vietnamese subgroups, the researchers found.

For the study, investigators analyzed U.S. death records from 2003 to 2012 to determine aver...

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Would you be able to recognize if you or someone close to you were having a stroke? A stroke is a 911 medical emergency and every second counts for survival.

To help you recognize the signs of stroke, the National Stroke Association wants you to remember F-A-S-T, or fast.

F stands for "face." Signs of stroke include droopi...

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new version of an implantable heart pump could cut the risk of blood clots, bleeding and stroke in patients with advanced heart failure, according to a study funded by the device's maker.

The study included more than a thousand patients who received either Abbott Inc.'s HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or the HeartMate II....

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart patients who get a stent to prop open a blocked artery are typically put on a powerful anti-clotting drug and aspirin for a full year after their procedure.

Now, new research suggests these patients can safely drop the aspirin regimen after just three months, and lower their bleeding risk in the process.

"Even though this tre...

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When a weakened artery wall balloons or bulges, it's called an aneurysm. For people with emphysema, the risk of that aneurysm rupturing is much higher than for those without the lung condition, new research suggests.

While family history may play a role, how and why aneurysms develop is not well understood. The study, publi...

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Someday soon, devices like the Apple Watch might be monitoring wearers for heart conditions such as potentially dangerous atrial fibrillation, a new study suggests.

Atrial fibrillation, or "a-fib," is a common form of irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart problems. It affects up to 6 million A...

SUNDAY, March 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of aging Americans worried about heart attacks and strokes have for years popped a low-dose aspirin each day, thinking the blood thinner might lower their risk.

But new guidelines issued Sunday by two cardiology groups say that, for most adults, the practice may no longer be warranted.

The new heart health guidelines were i...

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eggs may not be all they've been cracked up to be.

A new study says eggs are a major source of dietary cholesterol and that cholesterol in the diet ups the risk of heart disease and premature death.

The researchers followed nearly 30,000 adults over three decades and found that eating three or four eggs a week was tied to a 6 percent ...

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Wellness Library Results - 11

It was more than a decade ago when Shawna Lee stepped into the sun room of her parents' house in Champaign, Illinois, and found her 60-year-old mother, Hsiu Lee, looking disoriented. "She told me, 'Your grandfather treated me badly his whole life.' Then she started crying and told me she couldn't button her blouse." "I thought this was weird and called the doctor, who said to come in right away," ...

Stroke survivors often feel as though they're lost in an alien landscape. Words can lose their meaning, familiar places and objects can become bewildering, and even the simplest tasks can seem overwhelming. Sufferers may someday return to their old world, but they can't make the trip on their own. For these reasons, stroke survivors need a concerned caregiver who can help ease the way to recovery....

Can depression and anxiety help cause hypertension? You don't need to measure your blood pressure to know that a heated argument or a walk down a dark alley can send that pressure soaring. Your pounding heart and flushed face say it all. Stress can temporarily boost blood pressure: For instance, some people have short-term hikes in blood pressure when they visit a doctor's office. Fortunately, th...

You've heard about the importance of a heart-healthy lifestyle. You might even have one. But have you given much thought to your brain? Every year, over 160,000 Americans die from strokes, and many more become permanently disabled. Like heart attacks, strokes are closely tied to a person's daily habits. By making a few healthy changes, especially if you're under 55, you can dramatically cut your r...

Within minutes, a stroke can ravage your brain, potentially robbing you of a world of skills that, until now, you've taken entirely for granted. Among the precious things you may lose is the ability to walk -- at least at the beginning. "It was frustrating and scary. I couldn't stand or move," recalls Melanie Goldberg*, who suffered her stroke in 1998 at the age of 52. "Basically you want to be in...

For many people who have had a stroke, simply walking again can be extremely daunting. And if there are steps to climb or narrow doorways to pass through, it may seem downright impossible. Barriers to safe walking pop up in places that people wouldn't have considered dangerous terrain before having a stroke. Outdoors, inclines in the sidewalk can change from block to block -- and that's one of the...

Have you ever asked for a "thingamajig" when you really meant a screwdriver? Have you ever misread a word on a street sign as you drove past? Of course. Everybody has language glitches every now and then. Now try to imagine a world where everything is a thingamajig and every sign, book, or menu is gibberish. For many people recovering from a stroke, this world is a reality. Every year, 80,000 stro...

When someone has had a stroke, the damage to speech and movement is usually obvious. But for some stroke survivors, having trouble swallowing can be an invisible -- but extremely disabling -- aftereffect. Although there is no hard data on the number of people who have difficulty swallowing after a stroke, the American Stroke Association says the problem may occur in up to 65 percent of stroke pati...

It happened so fast. Sharon Brooks, co-owner of the trendy but now-defunct Hamburger Mary's restaurant in San Francisco, was ringing out the cash register and trying to reach her son's girlfriend on the phone. But when the young woman answered, all that came out of Brooks' mouth was gibberish. "I tried to talk and couldn't. I went into the bathroom and felt my left side tingling," says Brooks, wh...

What is a stroke? The gray matter in our brains may get all the credit for our intellectual powers and nerve coordination, but it's blood that really keeps us going. If something interrupts blood flow in or to the brain, parts of the brain will quickly die. A stoppage in one of the brain's arteries is called a stroke, and it's the third leading cause of death in the United States. It's also a lea...

If you've been diagnosed with a major illness -- like heart disease, diabetes, heart failure, cancer, or asthma -- you've probably already done a lot of research on your condition. That's a wise move. Staying informed is an important step toward staying healthy. You can learn a lot about your illness on the Internet or at a hospital library, but no Web site or medical journal in the world can tel...

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