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Health News Results - 540

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children who have surgery for a broken elbow may be overprescribed potentially addictive opioid painkillers, a new study finds.

Overprescription includes giving kids too many opioids when they are sent home -- raising the risk that any leftover meds will be "diverted" for illicit use.

"This study suggests that orthopedic surgeons re...

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity is closely linked to development of a child's mental skills -- ones essential to academic success and navigating challenges they'll face throughout life.

Studies show that boosts in thinking ability, or executive function, often follow bouts of activity. But only one-third of children are physically active every day. Less th...

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with autism are more than twice as likely to have sleep problems than typical kids or those with other developmental delays, a new study reports.

Several factors profoundly affect the sleep of 2- to 5-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), said lead researcher Dr. Ann Reynolds. They are more likely to resist their bedtim...

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Time spent on Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook probably isn't driving teenagers to depression, a new study contends.

In fact, Canadian researchers found the relationship worked in the opposite direction -- teenage girls who were already depressed tended to spend more time on social media, to try to feel better.

These findings run count...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Strokes do not discriminate by age.

They hit when the factors are right -- and those factors can be found as frequently in younger adults who have strokes as in an older population, according to a new study.

Stroke is most common in adults 65 and older. But the stroke rate among younger adults has steadily increas...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bouncing around at a trampoline park can be great fun, but a new study warns it can also be an invitation to sprains, strains and broken bones.

Nationwide, more than 100,000 emergency room visits were related to trampoline injuries in 2014, according to the latest data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Injuries that o...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could lead to more U.S. babies born with congenital heart defects, researchers say.

Specifically, they concluded that hotter temperatures may lead to as many as 7,000 additional cases between 2025 and 2035 in eight representative states: Arkansas, Texas, California, Iowa, North Carolina, Georgia, New York and Utah.

...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fish oil did not improve asthma control in overweight/obese young people with uncontrolled disease, a new study shows.

It included 98 participants, aged 12 to 25, who had diagnosed asthma but poor asthma control, despite using a daily inhaled corticosteroid.

Three-quarters of the participants took four grams of fish oil a day for si...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The concern over vaping has continued to build as e-cigarettes have become more popular, especially with kids and teens.

Vaping -- inhaling liquid nicotine vapors -- was first marketed as a way to help adults quit smoking. But younger people, including tweens, quickly seized on it as a way around conventional cigarettes, some attracted by th...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The supply of donor organs for infants needing a heart transplant is critically low, but researchers have taken a first step toward using pig hearts to fill the need.

The concept of using animal organs to save human lives has been around for years. With donor organs in short supply, the hope is that animal organs can keep patients alive while ...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young children spend a lot of time fiddling with smartphones, tapping away at tablets and staring at TV screens.

Could this time be taking away from their early physical and mental development?

A new study argues that's precisely the case -- screen time can affect how well children perform on developmental tests.

"Kids who...

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Youth suicide rates are higher in U.S. states with greater rates of homes containing guns, a new study finds.

"This study demonstrates that the strongest single predictor of a state's youth suicide rate is the prevalence of household gun ownership in that state," said study co-author Michael Siegel. He is a professor of community health scienc...

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While one in five kids may have a learning disability that requires one-on-one intervention, others may simply need to develop good study habits to improve their grades.

But good study habits don't always come easily or naturally. You can help your 'tween or teen develop them with a few easy steps, and save both of you hours of stress and ar...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood lead exposure may trigger the development of long-term mental health problems, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a decades-long tracking of nearly 600 New Zealanders. All were born between 1972 and 1973. At that time, most gas products still contained high levels of lead. Lead exposure was assessed at age 11, followed ...

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents often worry that violent movies can trigger violence in their kids, but a new study suggests PG-13-rated movies won't turn your kids into criminals.

Researchers found that as PG-13 movies became more violent between 1985 and 2015, overall rates of murder and violence actually fell.

"It doesn't appear that PG-13-rated movies ...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. emergency rooms routinely prescribe antibiotics to babies with the common viral lung infection bronchiolitis, counter to recommendations issued more than a decade ago, a new study finds.

Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization for U.S. babies in their first year of life. In bronchiolitis, the lung's small airways (bronchi...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Not every budding musician will become a rock star, but studying music has brain bonuses for kids, even those who don't take up an instrument until their teen years.

There's no doubt that participation in in-school music programs boosts motivation. Mastering an instrument or performing with a group brings a sense of accomplishment and is a ...

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all TV food ads aimed at Hispanic and black children in the United States are for unhealthy products, a new report claims.

In 2017, black teens saw more than twice as many ads for unhealthy food products as white teens, researchers found.

"Food companies have introduced healthier products and established corporate responsibil...

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When children are having suicidal thoughts, their parents may often be in the dark, a new study shows.

The study included more than 5,000 kids, aged 11 to 17, and one parent for each child. Researchers found that among the children, 8 percent said they had contemplated suicide at some time. But only half of their parents were aware of it.

...

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cereal TV ads aimed at young children put them at increased risk for obesity and cancer, researchers warn.

A poor diet, including too much sugar, can lead to obesity, a known risk factor for 13 cancers.

"One factor believed to contribute to children's poor quality diets is the marketing of nutritionally poor foods directly to childr...

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know how important fiber is for overall health, making meals more filling and staying "regular."

But did you know that children need their fair share of fiber, too? And for the same reasons.

How much is enough? In general, the U.S. Institute of Medicine states that monitoring fiber intake should start early in life, and by thei...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ritalin, a widely used stimulant drug to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), likely poses no risk of heart damage in children, new research in monkeys suggests.

The findings are "very reassuring," said the study's principal investigator, Dr. Steven Lipshultz.

Each year, more than 1.8 million children in the Unit...

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say children's skeletons are maturing sooner than they did early in the 20th century, and this could affect the timing of certain orthopedic treatments.

Girls are reaching full skeletal maturity nearly 10 months earlier and boys nearly seven months earlier, according to the University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers.

...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of kids with Down syndrome often worry whether their children can develop life skills, but new research suggests that the picture is far from bleak.

"More and more parents are opting for prenatal testing during their pregnancies, and if they learn about a diagnosis of Down syndrome they want to know real-life answers to such questions,"...

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A program that maps out the genes of newborns has allowed researchers to identify risks for some inherited childhood conditions, many of which can be prevented.

The so-called BabySeq Project discovered that slightly more than 9 percent of infants carry genes that put them at risk for medical conditions as they reach childhood.

"The Ba...

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Schools that promote healthy eating may reduce kids' risk of obesity, new research finds.

Their study of nearly 600 middle schoolers in New Haven, Conn., found that such efforts limited increases in kids' body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight).

The efforts included nutrition newsletters for stude...

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Moving from one community to another can be difficult for everyone in the family, especially if leaving friends and relatives behind. But the problems can be magnified for kids who have to switch middle or high schools.

Studies show that, for high school students, moving just once in a 12-month period can cut in half the likelihood of their g...

MONDAY, Dec. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Forcing children to apologize before they're ready may do more harm than good, researchers say.

Children know when someone is truly sorry and an insincere apology may increase the offended child's dislike of the child offering the apology, University of Michigan scientists reported.

It's better to give the offending child time and h...

MONDAY, Dec. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to so-called good foods and bad foods, it's pretty easy to separate a green salad from a piece of pie. But some healthy foods can become less beneficial for you simply because of the way you cook them.

Researchers analyzed three years of eating patterns of kids between the ages of 7 and 13 who gained excess weight in that time, a...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Regular bedtimes and adequate sleep during childhood may contribute toward a healthy weight in the teen years, a new study finds.

The study included nearly 2,200 kids in 20 U.S. cities. One-third of them had consistent, age-appropriate bedtimes between ages 5 and 9, according to their mothers.

Compared to that group, those who had no...

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the past two decades, opioid overdose death rates among U.S. kids and teens have tripled, a new study shows.

Young children have either died from accidental ingestion of narcotics or from intentional poisoning. Meanwhile, teens have died from unintentional overdoses, using their parents' prescription painkillers or narcotics bought on the s...

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking of buying your kid a BB, pellet or paintball gun for Christmas? Don't forget eye protection, the American Academy of Ophthalmology urges.

The number of eye injuries related to so-called "nonpowder guns" are increasing at an alarming rate. In fact, one study published earlier this year found a nearly 170 percent increase in these typ...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Car crashes and guns have been the two leading killers of kids in the United States for decades, and deaths from both causes are on the rise.

More children have been dying from motor vehicle crashes and firearms injuries since 2013, a new report shows.

Car crashes accounted for 20 percent of all deaths for children aged 19 and you...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sending report cards home from school on Fridays is linked to a surge in child abuse, a new study finds.

"It's a pretty astonishing finding," said lead study author Melissa Bright, a research scientist with the University of Florida's Anita Zucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studies.

"It's sad, but the good news is there...

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Good sleep routines can help children get the rest they need, researchers say.

For the new report, investigators reviewed 44 studies from 16 countries in North America, Europe and Asia. The studies included a total nearly 300,000 children, aged 4 months to 18 years.

"Good sleep hygiene gives children the ...

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are so closely linked that they not only run in families, but each increases the risk of the other in future siblings, a new study finds.

Younger siblings of children with autism have a 30-fold increased relative risk they'll be diagnosed with autism themselves. They're also nearly fou...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children with strong family ties and school support are more likely to try to stop bullying when they see it, new research suggests.

The study included 450 sixth-graders and 446 ninth-graders who were asked about their relationships with their family, friends and teachers.

The students were then presented with six scenarios of specif...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The numbers are alarming.

According to U.S. health officials, more than 200,000 children aged 14 or under are treated each year in emergency departments for playground-related injuries, about 10 percent of which involve "TBIs" -- or traumatic brain injuries.

Modern playground designs help reduce the risk of injury from falls, but they...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Gavin Kuykendall's life has been shaped by his fight against heart disease. Now almost 12, he recently expressed all he's been through -- by writing a letter to his heart disease.

"You made my parents very sad," he said, reading his letter in a video. "You tried to make my birthday an overwhelming and unhappy day. Even though you...

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Brown-bag lunches give you control over what you eat and what your children eat, but studies show that these to-go meals need to be healthier. This is especially important for kids because their eating habits are developed during the preschool years.

Recent studies have evaluated lunches for preschoolers by comparing their contents to the Hea...

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's been a steady decline in opioid prescriptions for children and teens in the United States since 2012, a new study reveals.

"Understanding patterns of opioid use in children and adolescents is important because use in early life has been associated with a higher likelihood of opioid misuse in the future," said the study's first author, J...

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Yet another study reveals that autism is far more common than once thought, with nearly 3 percent of American children diagnosed with the disorder.

A federal study published last week reported that one in 40 children have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and a second study that was published online Dec. 3 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're shopping for toys this holiday season, make sure some simple, old-fashioned items are on your list, pediatricians say.

In a new report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is making recommendations on the best toys to buy for babies and young children. The bottom line: The traditional beats the digital.

"This report is ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A 6-year-old boy with severe asthma wasn't responding to the usual treatments. It was only when family members stopped smoking marijuana at home that his breathing got better, according to his doctor.

The boy's case shows that exposure to secondhand pot smoke can worsen asthma in children who have a marijuana allergy, a new study reports.

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Do so-called hypoallergenic dogs really protect you against asthma?

Many dog-lovers believe it, but Swedish researchers found no evidence that "allergy-friendly" breeds -- such as poodles and miniature Schnauzers -- actually lower the risk for the wheezing lung disease.

Previous studies have shown that growing up with dogs can reduc...

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of American kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have a genetic vulnerability to the disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 55,000 individuals and identified 12 gene regions linked with ADHD. These regions probably affect the central nervous system, the study authors said. The...

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The wheezy lung disease asthma is yet one more problem linked to excess weight in childhood, a new study suggests.

The research contends that as many as 10 percent of pediatric asthma cases in the United States could be avoided if childhood obesity were eliminated.

"There are very few preventable risk factors for asthma -- obesity ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents, there are a number of questions you should ask when your child is prescribed antibiotics in the hospital, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.

While antibiotics can save lives, overuse of the drugs can lead to antibiotic resistance.

"It's important to select the right antibiotic dose at the right time for the right dur...

THURSDAY, Nov. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- How quickly children pick up language skills may help predict their IQ in middle age, a new Danish study suggests.

The researchers found a significant association between IQ test results at age 50 and the speed at which participants achieved a number of developmental milestones in childhood.

"Most studie...

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Not all the toys in Santa's sack are safe to play with. Among this year's most dangerous playthings are data-collecting dolls and fidget spinners full of lead, a new report says.

"We should be able to trust that the toys we buy are safe. However, until that's the case, toy buyers need to watch out for common hazards when shopping for children...

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Wellness Library Results - 238

With his 2-year-old upstairs taking a nap, Tim Anderson* seized the chance to do some yard work. A few moments later, he was bewildered to find the toddler lying on the lawn, crying inconsolably. That's odd, he thought: How did he get downstairs so fast? Then, to his horror, he noticed a window screen lying beside his son. Alone in his room, the enterprising tot had managed to push out the screen ...

As the Girl Scouts motto goes: Be prepared. The better supplied you are before your baby gets here, the smoother your transition to parenthood will be. What follows is a handy checklist so you can make sure you've got the right stuff in time for your new arrival. Infant car seat You won't be able to leave the hospital without an infant car seat. In fact, if you don't have one, the hospital may loa...

What is Lyme disease? Lyme disease is an infection that your child can get if he's bitten by a tick carrying certain bacteria. Doctors call it the "great imitator" because it mimics other diseases, making it difficult to diagnose; in addition, a blood test can't confirm it until about three weeks following the bite. Left untreated, the infection can develop into a serious long-lasting illness th...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, you want to show him his behavior is unacceptable and must change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages you don't want to send:

What is swimmer's ear? It's an ear infection that kids and adults commonly get by swimming in a pool or lake. Water seeps into the ear canal and erodes its protective lining, making it easier for bacteria and fungi to take hold and multiply. Any infection of the external ear -- that is, in or near the ear canal, as opposed to the middle ear -- is categorized as swimmer's ear. How could my child ...

Why does my child have tantrums? Some preschoolers throw tantrums for the same reasons they did as toddlers: because they're exhausted, hungry, or scared. But at this age it's more likely because your child wants to test your authority or manipulate you. This isn't a knock on your parenting skills or a sign that he'll be a rebellious teenager; it's a normal part of his development and growing ind...

How can I stop my child from teasing? The short answer is you can't. Every child teases, from the peekaboo of infancy to the "I'm going to get you!" round-the-sofa chases of early childhood. But you can stop your child from teasing too much or too harshly. Try giving your child these simple dos and don'ts:

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? The best course is to help him develop his emotional intelligence (loosely defined as the ability to cope with one's own feelings as well as those of others). This will enable him to sense when his teasing is mean-spirited, hostile, or simply inappropriate. Here are some tips:

A few hundred years ago, doctors believed baby teeth could be deadly. In one year alone in 19th-century England, more than 5,000 babies supposedly died of teething. Today, we know that teething isn't really dangerous. New teeth can make your baby cranky and uncomfortable, but the misery will soon pass. Here's what you need to know to help both of you get through this trying time. How can I tell ...

What causes allergies? Every human body carries an arsenal of chemicals to fight off bacteria, viruses, and other intruders, but sometimes these weapons backfire. If your child has allergies, she responds to things in the environment that are not invaders. The body produces antibodies, and when your child is exposed to the irritant a second time, her body releases a number of chemicals. One of th...

Why does my child bite her nails? Nail biting is one of the somewhat misnamed "nervous habits," which also include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. But anxiety is only one reason children bite their nails; your child might be doing so for a number of other reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit....

How do I know when my child's ready? Boys tend to stay in diapers longer than girls, but most children are ready to potty-train sometime between their second and third birthdays. There's enormous variation, though: Some children train themselves when they're about 18-months-old, while others show no interest until after their fourth birthday. To figure out if it's time to start the process, ask ...

Why does my child bite her nails? Your child may bite her nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. Nail biting is most common in high-strung and spirited children, tends...

You're trying not to worry, but your child's third birthday is behind him -- and maybe his fourth or fifth -- and he's still in diapers. Don't despair. Learning to use the toilet is a skill much like learning to tie shoes or ride a bicycle, and it poses a different set of challenges for each child. Here are seven common problems and strategies for solving them. My child refuses to use the toilet...

Why does my child bite his nails? Children bite their nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. (None of these necessarily signals anxiety, so "nervous habits" is somethi...

Should I be worried that my toddler sucks his pacifier all the time? No. For children between the ages of 1 and 3, sucking on a thumb or pacifier is natural. It can help your child with new challenges, such as sleeping through the night, eating with the family, and going on a long car ride. Sucking is a life skill that your child began in the womb and perfected as an infant. As he becomes a todd...

Do I need a contract when I hire a nanny? No, but it's a good idea to go through the process of drawing one up. If you're an easygoing type and your nanny seems agreeable, you might not want to bother with writing a formal agreement that could bring prickly issues to the surface. But you and your nanny (and your partner, if you have one) really should have a conversation about the ground rules of...

Should I be worried that my 3-year-old won't go anywhere without his pacifier? No, but it's probably not too early to begin encouraging your child to be less dependent on it. Most children stop using pacifiers between the ages of 2 and 4, but many stop well before that. You can always force your child to do without his "binky" by taking it away. But you're much better off persuading him that giv...

Why does my toddler need a nap? Most 2- to 3-year-olds need 12 to 13 hours of sleep a day -- and it's a rare child who will stack them all together. Trying to adjust a child's schedule so she does may cause nighttime sleep problems, since being overtired can cause her to become hyperactive. How many naps does she need, and how long should I let her sleep? Most kids give up their morning nap by...

To ease the pressure you naturally feel about finding the most nurturing and safe environment for your child, it's smart to begin your search for daycare early. Make your first inquiries about six months before your child will start attending. In some areas you may need to get on the case even earlier. You can use this set of questions as a guide when you sit down to discuss a center's program w...

There are things we just don't talk about in polite company. There are subjects one doesn't broach at the dinner table. Take bodily vermin, for example. A few months ago, I couldn't have pictured myself sipping a post-prandial cup of coffee and Sambuca at a friend's house, chitchatting about the efficacy of various techniques for ridding one's household of lice and their dastardly offspring, nits,...

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

What should I do if my child breaks a bone or dislocates a joint? A broken bone or dislocated joint is a serious injury that requires a doctor's immediate attention. The best thing you can do is protect the injured area, making sure your child doesn't worsen the damage. Fractures are breaks, cracks, or chips in a bone. A fractured bone that pierces through the skin is called an open fracture. ...

If you're preparing for an international adoption, you're probably knee-deep in paperwork, waiting to be matched, or scheduling a flight for China, Russia, India, or another country to meet your new son or daughter for the first time. With all the excitement, medical tests for your child after you return home may be the last thing on your mind. But once you get home, it should be high on your li...

What are mumps? Caused by a virus that infects the salivary glands near the jawbone, mumps is a highly contagious illness that shows up mainly in swelling and soreness in the jaw area. The swelling is usually on both sides, so that the sufferer bears a passing resemblance to a chipmunk. In some cases, though, one side may puff up several days before the other. Your child may run a fever and compl...

Consider the standards used to diagnose oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and you may think they could describe any kid on a bad day -- and almost any teenager almost every day: They argue with adults, deliberately annoy people, defy rules, and have high fits of temper. All these activities are all-too-familiar to parents. The distinction lies in the frequency and intensity of the behavior. F...

Why does my child interrupt me so often? Small children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exists for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before he forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore the very concept of interrupting makes no sense to your toddler....

Why does my child constantly interrupt me? Until they reach the age of 3 or 4, children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exist for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before she forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore, the very concept of interruptin...

Why does my child interrupt all the time? Interrupting comes naturally to children because they tend to forget that other people have needs that are as important (or almost, at least) as theirs. Even if your child knows that she's supposed to wait for a pause in the conversation and say, "Excuse me," the protocol slips her mind because what she has to say feels so urgent at that moment. Your ch...

Ever wonder where kids get so much energy? Today's typical 5-year-old eats almost 600,000 calories each year -- that's a lot of fuel for a small body. These vast reserves of energy come in handy for games of freeze tag and neighborhood bike races. But many kids barely tap into their supply. It doesn't take many calories to watch Power Rangers, sort Pokemon cards, or play Crash Bandicoot on the Nin...

Almost all new dads discover amazing talents in the first few days of fatherhood. But even the toughest guys can be afraid of babies -- especially their own. As soon as a first-time father carries his newborn through the front door, his life opens up to brand-new worries, doubts, and insecurities. Even before he unwraps that first diaper, his life has changed forever. Larry McGrail, a registered...

So you've heard great things about the magic of time-out -- the disciplinary tactic of removing a misbehaving child from the action for a dose of quiet time -- only it seems to have no effect on your little one? Here's guidance on how to resolve the five most common problems faced by parents who try time-out with a toddler. My child just ignores me. If your 1- or 2-year-old looks at you blankl...

Every once in a while, when you're at your wit's end, you give your child a time-out, but it never seems to work. Maybe he throws a tantrum or refuses to sit still and goes running through the house. Don't give up. Time-out -- checking misbehavior by removing your child from his current situation for a few minutes of quiet time -- is one of the most effective strategies in the parental game plan. ...

When your child acts up, often the best way to nip the behavior in the bud is to remove him from the activity at hand and give him some quiet time alone. This technique, known as time-out, is a great, nonviolent way to shape behavior. But the key to success is knowing the right time and way to introduce it. Here are six secrets to making the technique work. Understand what time-out is -- and isn...

Time-out is a method of checking misbehavior by removing your child from her current situation for a few minutes of quiet time. It's a great way to help your child calm down and regroup. Between the ages of 3 and 6, children are intensively learning rules and testing limits. Time-out can be particularly useful in establishing these, as long as you apply it consistently. Here are eight ways to make...

Theresa Quillen, a day-care worker for the last 20 years in Philadelphia, deeply loves children -- even the one who sent her to the hospital. The 3-year-old boy didn't mean to hurt her. He just happened to be standing around when another 3-year-old was looking for someone to punch. Quillen rushed to pull the boy out of harm's way. "As soon as I picked him up, I felt a sharp pain in my back," she ...

Before your baby is born, you should take time to make the great diaper decision: cloth or disposable? Both types have pluses and minuses, and neither option is clearly superior. Most parents today opt for disposable diapers, but some parents continue to swear by old-fashioned cloth. You may even go for a combination: cloth diapers at home and disposable when you go out. If you haven't already mad...

What is croup? Croup is a common childhood infection marked by labored breathing and hoarse coughing. It's most likely to show up in toddlers, but it can occur at any age. Croup usually begins as a respiratory infection, and a child may have a runny nose for several days before beginning to cough. If your child has croup, her airways will probably become sore and swollen, making it hard for her ...

At one time or another, almost every child will refuse to take a pill or swig of medicinal syrup. Here are some tips to help the medicine go down:

  • Be honest. Do not tell your child that the medicine is candy (he might suddenly crave a handful). Instead, explain that the medicine is very important and that you will find some way to help him to take it.
  • If liquids are the only opt...

How can I tell if my child's too sick for daycare? It's not always easy. Obviously you don't want your kid to pass a phlegmy cough along to all his pals, but it's a much harder call when he has nothing more than a runny nose. In general, you shouldn't bring your child to daycare if the illness is contagious and could do anything more than make any youngster a little cranky. Here are some spe...

What is a middle ear infection? A middle ear infection is simply an invasion of viruses or bacteria into the small space that lies just beyond the eardrum. The germs usually stage the assault while a child is recovering from a cold or flu, ailments that leave her ears partly clogged with fluids and create an ideal habitat for microbes. As the infection takes hold, the middle ear fills with pus, a...

What's the measles vaccine rash? It's a rash that shows up in about 5 percent of people vaccinated for measles (rubeola). The rash looks a bit like the one caused by the disease itself: red dots on the chest and neck. These may occasionally become raised bumps and in rare cases may spread to the rest of your child's body. The rash usually appears about 10 days after your child was vaccinated, but...

The only thing working parents dread hearing more than the words "I feel bad" from one of their kids is an early-morning phone call bringing the news that their nanny is ill. Instead of praying it won't happen and going into a panic when it does, make a plan. What are the options when I can't use my usual childcare? Backup options generally fall into one of two main categories: finding someone...

How can I make sure my child feels ready for daycare or preschool? For starters, remember that both you and your child will need time to get used to the new setup. Try to be patient; even if you make every effort to prepare your child, it will probably be a few days before she comes skipping over to you at pick-up time, more eager to show you her art project than to go home. Here are some tips...

If you find that you're not immediately overwhelmed with love with your newborn, don't worry. Like any other emotional relationship, developing a connection with your child can take time. Similarly, as with any other relationship, this one will have its own unique rhythms and pace of development. The timing will depend upon you and your baby; your experience of childbirth and your life circumstanc...

Can children get type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes used to be practically unheard of in people under 30. That explains the other common name for the disease: adult-onset diabetes. Not long ago, almost all children with diabetes suffered from the type 1 form of the disease, which means their bodies couldn't produce enough insulin. And type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas may produce normal insulin...

Children with diabetes usually have what is called type 1 diabetes, one form of the disease known as diabetes mellitus. It's an autoimmune disease, which means the body's own immune system, designed to attack infectious agents invading from outside, instead attacks cells that perform a healthy, normal body function. In type 1 diabetes, essential cells of the pancreas are destroyed. Normally, these...

Once upon a time not so long ago, in a land very close to home, children faced bleak prospects when it came to learning about and coping with type 1 diabetes. Stern lectures from clinicians and educators, do's and don'ts imposed by parents, secrecy borne of fear that peers would shun them. By comparison, eating spinach or visiting the dentist was a breeze. Today, however, high-tech tools make kids...

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