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Results for search "Liver Disease: Misc.".

Health News Results - 27

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The popular weed killer Roundup might be linked to liver disease, a new study suggests.

A group of patients suffering from liver disease had elevated urine levels of glyphosate, the primary weed-killing ingredient in Roundup, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

"We found those patients who had m...

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a North American first, an anonymous living liver donation led to a rare paired living liver donor exchange in Canada last summer that saved the lives of two people with failing livers.

Kelly Bryan, 38, donated 70% of her liver to an adult stranger, Muhammad Khan, who needed a liver transplant. Then that recipient's wife, Hina Khan,...

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- She thought red yeast supplements would be a natural way to lower her cholesterol. What could be easier?

Instead, the 64-year-old woman landed in the hospital with acute liver damage that her doctors say was likely caused by taking the over-the-counter product.

"Many people are cautious to use [prescription] medications because of p...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of hepatitis C cases and related deaths could be prevented, but it will require a significant investment, researchers say.

In the first study to model such measures worldwide, the authors concluded that sweeping prevention, screening and treatment efforts could prevent 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis...

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A large number of U.S. cancer patients with hepatitis B and C don't know they have the virus, which can cause life-threatening complications during some cancer treatments, researchers say.

The findings suggest screening for hepatitis B and C may be appropriate in community cancer clinics, according to investigators from the SWOG Cancer Researc...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of U.S. liver transplant recipients with alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) doubled over 15 years, but significant regional variations remain, a new study finds.

ALD has replaced hepatitis C as the most common reason for U.S. liver transplants. One reason is that hepatitis C rates have decreased due to antiviral therapy. ...

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with the hepatitis C virus can cause liver disease and even liver cancer. But once found, the virus can be cured, so screening is vital for those at risk, health experts say.

For hepatitis A and B, preventive vaccines exist, but there is none for hepatitis C.

"We can eliminate the virus and keep people from developing live...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy in the United States has now declined for three years in a row, fueled largely by a record number of drug overdose deaths and rising suicide rates, new government statistics show.

"It's really the first time we've seen this multi-year drop" in decades, said Renee Gindi, chief of the Analytic Studies Branch of the National Ce...

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who get a liver transplant from an older donor have better long-term survival than those who refuse this type of transplant, new research shows.

Transplant surgeons mainly use livers from donors under age 70 to avoid risks such as rejection and death. But a shortage of organs means that many patients die while on the transplant waitin...

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Take two aspirins and reduce your risk of liver cancer? New research suggests this weekly routine might help.

The researchers found that taking two or more standard-dose (325 milligram) pills a week was associated with a 49 percent lower risk of liver cancer.

"Regular use of aspirin led to significantly lower risk of developing [liver...

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy in the United States has declined for two years in a row, fueled by increasing death rates from opioid drug overdoses, suicides and chronic liver disease, a new government report shows.

"It's really the first time we've seen this multi-year drop" in decades, said Renee Gindi, chief of the Analytic Studies Branch of the Natio...

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Great Recession continues to take a grim toll: Since 2009, a growing number of Americans have died from liver disease and liver cancer.

The increase among 25- to 34-year-olds is especially troubling because the deaths are due to cirrhosis, a disease caused by excessive drinking, the authors of a new study said. The researchers suspect t...

FRIDAY, June 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Liver cancer cases in several developed countries have doubled in the past 25 years, due to the continuing obesity epidemic and a spike in hepatitis infections, new research suggests.

Even worse, the sharp rise in liver cancer cases is starting to swamp the limited number of liver specialists in those nations, the researchers added.

...

MONDAY, June 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More good news for coffee lovers: Having three or more cups of "joe" each day may help ward off serious liver ailments, new research suggests.

The 26-year study of more than 14,000 Americans couldn't prove cause and effect. However, participants who drank three-plus cups of coffee a day were 21 percent less likely to find themselves hospitali...

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who get a liver transplant often require less anti-rejection medication, and new research helps explain why.

"This study shows that the liver transplant itself regulates the host's immune responses. Compared to the other organs, the liver is immunologically a very active organ, so it is capable of regulating the immune responses agains...

WEDNESDAY, April 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity can lead to liver disease in kids as young as 8 years old, a new study warns.

The long-term study of 635 children in Massachusetts found that a bigger waist size at age 3 increases the odds that a child will have a marker for liver damage and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by age 8.

That marker is called ALT. By age 8, 2...

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Bacon lovers, a new study has some bad news for you: Eating a lot of processed and red meats may up your odds for a serious liver condition and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

The study found that people who consumed the highest amounts of red and processed meats had nearly a 50 percent increased risk of non-alcoholic fa...

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A brutal flu season has had people reaching for relief in their medicine cabinet, but a new study warns that overdosing on acetaminophen (Tylenol) is more common when bugs and viruses are circulating.

It turns out that the odds of taking more than the recommended 4 grams a day jumps 24 percent during these months, said lead researcher Saul Sh...

MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Men who started drinking in their teens are at increased risk for liver disease, Swedish researchers report.

"Our study showed that how much you drink in your late teens can predict the risk of developing cirrhosis later in life," said lead investigator Dr. Hannes Hagstrom, with the Center for Digestive Diseases and Karolinska University Hospi...

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Think you know what's in your favorite supplement? Think again.

More than half of the herbal and dietary supplements analyzed by researchers contained ingredients that differed from the list on their labels.

Some had hidden ingredients that might actually harm health, researchers said.

Bodybuilding and weight-loss suppleme...

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Daily aspirin may reduce the risk of liver cancer for people with hepatitis B infection, a new study suggests.

Hepatitis B virus attacks the liver and can cause cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previous research suggests daily low-dose aspirin therapy may prevent cancer, but there is little clinical evidence on whether regular aspirin use can preve...

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Here's news that might sour you on sweets: New research shows that overdoing it on sugar might harm the livers of otherwise healthy men.

British researchers found that a sugar-rich diet was associated with unhealthily high levels of fat in both the blood and the liver.

The bottom line, said lead researcher Bruce Griffin, is that "cons...

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they were able to coax tiny "seeds" of liver tissue into fully functioning livers in mice.

If this approach works in people, it could help reduce long wait lists for liver transplants. It might also benefit people with failing livers who don't quality for liver transplants, according to the researchers.

The scienti...

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Regularly drinking coffee or herbal tea may help prevent chronic liver disease, new research suggests.

Scientists in the Netherlands found these popular beverages might help thwart liver fibrosis, or stiffness and scarring due to chronic inflammation.

"Over the past decades, we gradually deviated towards more unhealthy habits, incl...

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A bumper crop of deadly wild "death cap" mushrooms in northern California is likely to blame for the poisonings of 14 people in December, health officials say.

The culprit: Amanita phalloides, believed to be the world's most dangerous mushroom.

All 14 recovered, but three required liver transplants, and a toddler suffered pe...

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A pill that contains three powerful antiviral drugs might offer a cure for many hepatitis C patients who have failed other treatments, researchers report.

The pill -- which contains the antiviral drugs sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), velpatasvir and voxilaprevir -- was nearly 100 percent effective in curing hepatitis C in patients whose disease retur...

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Reports of new hepatitis C infections in the United States nearly tripled over five years, reaching a 15-year high, federal government data show.

The highest number of new infections were reported among 20- to 29-year-olds. Many stemmed from the growing use of injected drugs linked to the current opioid epidemic, officials said.

The n...

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Wellness Library Results - 20

The liver is a tough, resilient organ. We can flood it with toxins and expose it to nasty germs, and it still goes about its jobs of purifying blood, manufacturing bile, and keeping us alive. But even the liver has its limits. If it suffers too much damage over too many years, some of the cells will turn into scar tissue. This is called cirrhosis. If enough scar tissue forms, the liver will begin ...

What are clinical trials? Clinical trials are the means by which new drugs and treatments are tested to determine if they work. They are the engine that drives progress in medicine. For patients who have run out of other options, clinical trials offer a last chance at a potentially effective therapy. In some cases, they provide access to research treatments before they are made widely available. ...

If you've been diagnosed with hepatitis C, your doctor has probably advised you to give up alcoholic beverages. For some people, this can be one of the most difficult lifestyle adjustments to make. But it's also one of the most important. Several studies have shown that among people with hepatitis C, regular drinkers have higher levels of virus than nondrinkers, according to a report in the journ...

Hepatitis C viruses are so small that they can only been seen with the most powerful electron microscopes. Yet simple tests can reliably tell whether someone has been exposed to the virus. Other tests can show if someone still has an active infection. Still other tests are able to gauge the extent of damage to the liver. Often the first sign that something is wrong comes from a standard blood tes...

Unlike cold or flu viruses, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) does not spread easily. It is transmitted by direct contact with blood that carries the virus. Before screening donated blood for hepatitis C became mandatory in 1991, most transmission occurred through blood transfusions. Now that the blood supply is tested for the hepatitis C virus, this kind of transmission is extremely rare: It occurs le...

The rules are simple at Monday's lunchtime hepatitis C support group in the Oasis Clinic: Only one person speaks at a time, people's stories don't leave the room, and you can't have more than two slices of pizza. Larry Galindo, a 51-year-old former injection drug user, tells the group he's nervous about his upcoming yearlong course of treatment for hepatitis C. "Some people breeze through the tre...

If you've been diagnosed with hepatitis C, there is plenty you can do to stay healthy and lower your risk of developing serious liver disease. Like many diseases, hepatitis C is affected by the way we live -- what we eat, how much we exercise, even how we deal with stress. The healthier you are overall, the better your body can deal with the virus. The less strain you put on your liver, the health...

The symptoms of hepatitis C virus infection differ widely from one person to another. After being exposed to the virus, some people experience a short bout of symptoms that may include fever, loss of appetite, extreme fatigue, and pain on the right side of the abdomen. But most people carry the virus for years without ever noticing any symptoms. Many don't know they have HCV until they are tested....

Many people have heard of the type of hepatitis that is spread by water or food contaminated with the hepatitis A virus. A diagnosis of hepatitis C, however, is often more puzzling. Your doctor has probably given you some basic facts about hepatitis C, and these articles are designed to help you learn more. "Hepatitis" -- a term that means inflammation of the liver -- can have many causes. At lea...

Very understandably, almost everyone diagnosed with the hepatitis C virus asks the same question: "What's going to happen to me?" Unfortunately, with HCV infection, it's very hard for doctors to offer an answer. More than with most diseases, the course of HCV infection varies widely from person to person. In about 15 to 25 percent of people infected with the virus, their immune systems attack the...

Who gets hepatitis C? Anyone can get hepatitis C virus. But unlike a cold or flu virus, HCV isn't easy to catch. The virus is transmitted only by direct contact with human blood that contains the virus. There are several ways infection can occur. Those at risk of being infected with hepatitis C virus include:

It's natural for everyone to feel stress, but people with hepatitis C have additional concerns. There's the prospect of medical tests and procedures, worry over medical bills, and the fear of infecting others to name a few. Some people feel angry either at themselves or at someone else -- or simply at the rotten blow that life has handed them. That anger can lead to depression, which only adds to ...

Most people know him as bad guy JR Ewing on the TV show "Dallas." But lately the actor who played the part, Larry Hagman, has adopted a different role: champion for the cause of organ transplants. In 1995, Hagman, who had advanced cirrhosis, received a life-saving liver transplant. Since then, he has gone on to become honorary chairman of the U.S. Transplant Games, an Olympics-style competition h...

In 1968 Haight-Ashbury, in the afterglow of the Summer of Love, Steve Cochran* shot up heroin for the first time. He was 16, one of thousands of teens who poured into the symbolic center of the '60s to search for utopia and to sample free love and drugs. "I was hanging out in the most intense place in the most intense of times," he says. "I thought of myself as a drug adventurer. I experimented wi...

The word hepatitis is derived from Greek -- "hepar" meaning liver, and "-itis" meaning inflamed or diseased. The causes of hepatitis range from chronic alcoholism to chemical toxins. In addition, at least six different viruses that cause the disease have been identified. The most prevalent chronic infection in the United States is due to hepatitis C. Why do certain viruses target the liver? To be...

Dramatic advances have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C since the virus that caused it was first identified in 1989. The current treatment for most patients is a combination of two drugs: pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin. Together, these two drugs have been shown to slow or stop the progress of hepatitis C in some, but not all, patients. Although far from perfect treatments, they ...

Hepatitis C has been called a silent epidemic for its stealthy progress and -- until recently -- incognito status. Though it's the most common cause of chronic hepatitis in the United States, many people -- including some health care professionals -- still connect hepatitis with type A, the treatable virus contracted by ingesting feces-tainted food or water. Some Americans first heard of hepatitis...

While outcomes with hepatitis C are uncertain, there's no doubt about transmission. Direct blood exposure is the most efficient mode. Fortunately, the advent of highly sensitive blood-screening tests in 1992 has pretty much eliminated the risk involved in blood transfusion. Health care workers still face some risk, but actual transmission of HCV is small. About 1 percent of health care workers ex...

Your liver keeps you alive by filtering dangerous toxins from your blood. So what are you doing to return the favor? It's up to you to protect your liver from viruses, poisons, and other serious threats. Take this short quiz to find out how much you know about keeping your liver healthy. 1. It won't hurt my liver to take more than the recommended amount of Tylenol if I have a really bad headach...

It has been only 20 years since the hepatitis C virus was first identified. In that time, an extraordinary amount of progress has been made in the fight against this virus. Still, much needs to be done. Improved diagnostic tests are needed to identify people infected with HCV more precisely and less expensively than is possible today. Better ways to prevent transmission are urgently needed. With ...

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