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Results for search "Sports Medicine".

Health News Results - 76

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Student athletes usually need a sports physical. And the best place for that exam is at their primary care doctor's office, according to updated guidelines from leading U.S. medical experts.

"Whenever possible, the sports physical should be performed in the primary care physician's office, the same place where the child receives immunizations...

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes are supposed to be strong and self-assured, so many don't seek help for mental health issues, a new study finds.

It's not just the stigma of mental illness that prompts many to tough it out alone, but also busy schedules, gender stereotyping and lack of understanding about mental health issues.

That's the consensus of resea...

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Playing team sports is a great way to teach kids life lessons about leadership, teamwork and how to socialize with peers. Sports are also a great way to build self-esteem and gain physical skills. Most important, they're fun.

But too many -- nearly three-quarters of young athletes -- are specializing in just one activity as early as 7...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When NFL legend Frank Gifford died in 2015 at the age of 84, his family revealed that for years he'd suffered from mental issues caused by chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), tied to head trauma experienced during his years of play.

CTE was also thought to contribute to the suicide of retired NFL great Junior Seau at the age of 43.

...

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With concern over concussion dangers rising, most U.S. parents now say that they would support bans on tackling in youth football, a new survey shows.

Researchers found that of more than 1,000 parents in a national sample, 60 percent were in favor of age restrictions on tackling. Another quarter were in the "maybe" camp.

The study, ...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For young athletes, focusing on only one sport at an early age ups their odds for injury, a new study warns.

Sixty million kids play organized sports. By age 14, a growing number of them specialize in one sport with the goal of a college scholarship or professional career.

Researchers analyzed surveys completed by 202 athletes at o...

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A lower dose of a medication to prevent acute mountain sickness is as effective as the standard, higher dose, a new study finds.

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) can cause headaches, gastrointestinal upset, fatigue, weakness, vertigo and sleep problems.

Many hikers and climbers use a drug called acetazolamide (Diamox) to prevent AMS....

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's good news and bad news from a new study of children visiting U.S. emergency departments for head injuries: The rate of these potentially serious events has fallen among boys, but risen for girls.

In recent years, the danger of concussion from contact sports -- most notably football -- has garnered much media attention. So the author...

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Though coaches and parents are more alert to the need for emergency attention after young athletes suffer a concussion, many may not realize how long symptoms and other effects can linger.

A study in JAMA Pediatrics found that 31 percent of concussion victims had persistent symptoms after four weeks, as well as lower quality-of-life...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As American kids pack on the pounds, the number of those with back pain is on the rise.

One in three between the ages of 10 and 18 said they had backaches in the past year, according to a survey of about 3,700 youngsters. The incidence rose along with kids' age and weight and was higher among those who play competitive sports.

Thou...

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Athlete's heart" -- an enlarged heart created by intense physical training -- is a common and often brushed-off condition within elite and professional sports.

But a new study of National Football League players is raising concern about the long-term consequences of athlete's heart when it comes to retirees who have long left the field.

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Crippling brain injury from football can start early, even among high school players, a new study suggests.

And its effects can last over time, even without additional head impacts, researchers report.

Football players can develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after playing high school football, although higher rates of CTE a...

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Agility, or the ability to react quickly to change without losing your balance, is an important skill not only for playing sports, but also for everyday living.

Strength training helps improve agility, but so do balance and coordination exercises. Simple moves include standing on one foot, standing on tiptoe and walking heel to toe.

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- New research on 12 high school football players tracked for a season found that repeat head impacts affected the boys' vision -- even if those hits didn't result in concussion.

The Indiana University researchers stressed that the changes in vision did seem temporary.

But since vision tests are part of certain testing protocols for...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's more evidence that football may be changing the brains of adolescent players, and not in a good way.

In a new study, researchers looked at MRI scans of 26 football-playing boys averaging 12 years of age.

Comparing MRIs taken just before the football season and then three months after, the scans revealed that the boys had c...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Late-night tweeting leads to poorer next-day performance by professional basketball players, according to a new study that highlights how social media can affect sleep.

For the study, researchers examined statistics for games played between 2009 and 2016 by 112 National Basketball Association players who were verified Twitter users.

...

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effects of head injuries in football players begin at a young age, a new study finds.

Researchers tested college football players' blood for concussion markers and found that they had elevated levels of these markers before the season even started.

"It was quite shocking to learn that the biomarkers were high before th...

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Treatments for "tennis elbow" are generally ineffective, researchers say, but don't despair: The painful condition will usually clear up on its own.

Each year, approximately 200,000 Americans are diagnosed with tennis elbow -- inflammation caused by overuse of the tendons in the forearm. The condition can affect anyone who uses their hands a...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It may be possible to use a blood test to diagnose and manage athletes' concussions, but the results could vary by race and gender, researchers report.

In the new study, investigators analyzed the blood of college athletes and found that levels of certain proteins and peptides ("biomarkers") were higher in those who'd suffered a concussion ...

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes may be less likely to suffer concussions if they carry a gene linked to the learning disorder dyslexia, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the concussion history of 87 football players at Penn State University. They also checked the players for certain genes.

The findings suggest that "genotype may play a role in yo...

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated hits to the head, rather than one severe blow, may determine whether football players suffer a concussion, a new study suggests.

The findings underscore the need to limit head impacts during football practice and games, said study lead author Brian Stemper, of Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin.

Stemper'...

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young football players who suffer repeated head blows -- but not concussions -- may not sustain brain damage, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers followed 112 football players, aged 9 to 18, during the 2016 season.

"We expected repetitive impacts to correlate with worsening neurocognitive [brain] function, but we found...

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The most dangerous play in football can be rendered safer through a simple rule change, a new study out of the Ivy League suggests.

Moving the kickoff line forward by just five yards -- from the 35- to the 40-yard line -- reduced the average annual concussion rate in Ivy League football by more than 68 percent, the study revealed.

Th...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young athletes specializing in one sport may hope it's a ticket to an athletic scholarship in college, but a new analysis suggests the practice might also doom them to overuse injuries.

Pulling data from five prior studies, scientists found that athletes aged 18 and younger who concentrated on a single sport were nearly two times more like...

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sports-medicine research has called into question the value of warm-ups and cool-downs, and cast doubt on whether they really prevent muscle soreness.

However, there are still other benefits to these pre- and post-workout steps, and to stretching after both. But it's important to get the sequence right.

A warm-up preps your body for ...

FRIDAY, Aug. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Links between brain damage and contact sports continue to emerge, with scientists now tying repetitive head impacts to a condition that can lead to Parkinson's disease.

Researchers have already tied repetitive head impacts with the brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and dementia. Now, investigators who examined 694 brains afte...

TUESDAY, July 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Heading soccer balls poses a much greater threat to women's brains than men's, new research suggests.

The study included 49 female and 49 male amateur soccer players, aged 18 to 50. They reported a similar number of headings over the previous year (an average of 487 headings for the men and 469 for the women).

Brain scans revealed t...

WEDNESDAY, July 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Balance problems may be more common in soccer players who "head" the ball more often than their fellow athletes, a small study found.

The study included 20 soccer players, average age 22, who were given a balance test. The players also provided information about how often they headed the ball during games and practices.

The number...

FRIDAY, July 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga and Pilates are suitable for people of all ages and fitness levels, medical experts say.

These low-impact workouts don't require special equipment and, after initial training, can be done at home to improve physical and mental health.

"Both use your own body weight and can be tailored for levels from beginner to advanced," said D...

THURSDAY, July 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When a teen athlete is tired, their risk of suffering a common knee injury rises, a new study suggests.

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) connects the thighbone to the shinbone, at the knee. When the ACL is overstretched or torn, it can cause swelling, instability and pain. It can also lead to high treatment costs because it may require su...

THURSDAY, July 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Playing sports offers plenty of fitness and other developmental benefits for kids, but injuries are common. Every year, more than 2.6 million U.S. children aged 19 and under are treated in the ER for sports- and recreation-related injuries.

If your child plays team sports, start by vetting the qualifications of the coaches.

A questi...

THURSDAY, June 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Can you spell words backwards while you're walking?

Successfully performing that simple test of cognition could help decide whether a concussed athlete is safe to return to play, new research shows.

If the athlete can't simultaneously walk and think in this way, they may not be fully recovered from a concussion and could be at ris...

THURSDAY, June 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Student athletes who specialize in one sport year-round could lose out in academics and other fields, a new study finds.

"Today's students have so many responsibilities and when you add specializing in a sport -- with participation in school and club teams, practices, tournaments and lots of travel -- there just aren't enough hours in the day ...

THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The damaging effects of a concussion are well-known, and new research finds the injuries are common among U.S. high school students.

In a representative survey of nearly 15,000 kids in grades 9 through 12, just over 15 percent -- equal to 2.5 million American youths -- said they had suffered at least one concussion over the prior year.

...

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young athletes with a history of concussions may be at increased risk for leg injuries, preliminary research suggests.

The study included boys and girls who played soccer at 52 U.S. high schools. Those who'd suffered a concussion at any time in their life were 85 percent more likely to suffer leg injuries during one soccer season than those w...

THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If your favorite National Football League team has a make-or-break game this coming season, you might want to hope for a nighttime kickoff.

Pro football players make fewer mental errors and are less likely to suffer injuries in night games than in afternoon games due to body clock-related differences in their alertness, a new study contends.<...

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Arlington, Va. is the "most fit city in America."

So says the American College of Sports Medicine.

Among the nation's 100 largest cities, Arlington had the lowest smoking rate and highest reports of very good or excellent health, the sports medicine group said.

The city received an overall score of 77.7 on the college's ann...

MONDAY, May 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most states require school athletes to have a sports physical, and now is the time to book it, doctors say.

These physicals can reveal health problems that could impair athletic performance or even pose a risk of injury or death, according to Dr. John Higgins. He's a professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Hous...

MONDAY, April 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Waiting until you're thirsty to drink during sports could lead to dehydration and poorer performance, a new study finds.

"Drinking only to thirst typically leads to significant dehydration, which is associated with exercise performance impairment," said study author Stavros Kavouras, a professor and director of the Hydration Science Lab at th...

TUESDAY, April 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Confirming what many exhausted parents likely already know, scientists say a typical young boy is a sort of super athlete.

Compared with adults, preadolescent boys have a near matchless ability to endure and bounce back from high-intensity play, researchers report.

When it comes to post-exercise recovery, for example, an average bo...

THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women are more likely than men to suffer a knee injury called an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. But -- surprisingly -- the injury occurs the same way in both genders, a new study reveals.

Prior research suggested women are two to four times more likely to suffer ACL tears due to differences in how this type of injury occurs in the ...

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Headed to a Major League Baseball game? Be prepared to duck and cover.

As the 2018 season gets underway, a new study finds that fans' risk of being struck by a foul ball or flying bat at Major League Baseball (MLB) games is on the rise.

Each year, about 1,750 fans are hurt by foul balls at MLB games. That works out to about two inj...

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you love exercise, one of the hardest parts of suffering an injury is being sidelined. But if you take the time to heal a sprain or strain correctly, you'll get back in the game faster.

First, understand your injury to treat it appropriately. A sprain affects ligaments, the bands of tissue that connect bones at a joint. A strain is damage ...

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Knee replacement patients can continue to enjoy sports -- such as skiing, tennis and dancing -- without worrying that high-impact activities might compromise their new joint, a small, new study finds.

The researchers tracked patients for between five and 15 years after knee replacement surgery, known as total knee arthroplasty. They found th...

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The only equipment you really need to go running are running shoes. But choosing a pair can often feel like a shopping marathon.

There's no shortage of big box sporting goods stores, but ask the staff at a local running club for suggestions about where to shop. The salespeople at a specialty shoe store should be better able to suggest the righ...

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Highly caffeinated energy drinks aren't safe for children and teens, and should not be marketed to them, a leading sports medicine organization warns.

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) on Friday released an official statement about the beverages.

"Energy drinks are extremely popular, and concerns about their consumption a...

FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A group of former National Football League greats -- including Hall of Famers Harry Carson of the New York Giants and Nick Buoniconti of the Miami Dolphins -- is urging parents not to let their children play tackle football until they're at least 14 years old.

The group is instead endorsing a program called "Flag Football Under 14," launched ...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The link between concussions and brain injury might be a hot topic in the NFL, but at the high school level? Apparently not so much.

Overall, only about a third of high school athletes, their coaches and parents know that a concussion is a brain injury, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. The athletes themselves were the mo...

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Simple steps can help keep you from being sidelined by a sports injury.

First, make it a rule to bookend every workout with a warm-up and a cool-down. The warm-up is meant to increase your heart rate and blood flow to muscles. Start with some light cardio, like brisk walking, for your warm-up.

After 3 to 10 minutes, focus on increa...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young athletes have a very low risk of suffering a fatal cardiac arrest -- and most of those tragic cases probably cannot be predicted, new research suggests.

The study confirms that cardiac arrest is a rare thing among athletes younger than 45. It put the rate at about 0.76 cases per 100,000 competitive athletes each year -- at least in On...

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Wellness Library Results - 13

Triax Metabolic Accelerator is a hazardous supplement that attempts to stimulate weight loss by capturing hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) in a bottle. It contains a natural compound used in some prescription medicines, triiodothyroacetic acid (triac), which supposedly increases the activity of the thyroid gland. The gland controls your metabolism like a thermostat, and cranking it up can help...

Muscle cramps are a common ailment, especially in the legs and feet. Since muscle cramps are sometimes caused by dehydration (loss of water) and low levels of potassium, they frequently strike in hot weather, when your body loses water, salt, and minerals through sweating. Drinking plenty of water and eating foods rich in potassium, such as bananas, may help to ward off cramps. You can also get a...

The body carefully maintains its internal temperature at around 98.6 degrees. In hot weather, perspiration cools it off. But sometimes, even the best cooling system can be overwhelmed. Always be alert to the symptoms of heat stroke or exhaustion, especially when you or your friends exercise in hot weather, or work in hot, humid areas that don't have some form of ventilation. Heat exhaustion is a...

More people in the United States visit an orthopedic surgeon because of knee problems than for any other complaint. Knee pain results in more than 12 million visits to a doctor's office a year, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Down the road, many of these folks will end up with osteoarthritis in their damaged knee joints, facing knee replacements and other surgeries. But...

What is athletic heart syndrome? Athletic heart syndrome is a heart condition that may occur in people who exercise or train for more than an hour a day, most days of the week. Athletic heart syndrome isn't necessarily bad for you -- if you're an athlete. And it's not what makes young athletes expire in mid-court. While it does lead to structural changes in the heart, a person with the conditio...

How can I protect myself from sports injuries? You faithfully wear your goggles on the racquetball court, you never go in-line skating without your pads and helmet, and you stretch like a fanatic, yet you still get sidelined by injuries. What's going on? Although safety precautions are indispensable, there's more to staying injury-free than avoiding flying projectiles and cushioning your falls. ...

What's the difference between a strain and a sprain? Both strains and sprains are injuries caused by over-stretching. The muscles, tendons, and ligaments in your body are all elastic tissues, made for stretching to a point. Past that point, the tissue breaks. Both types of injuries can cause sharp and immediate pain. A strain is damage to a muscle or the tendon that links muscle to bone. The mos...

At a time when regular exercise among Americans seems to be at an all-time low, those who take the time to work out have reason to be proud. When exercise leads to a strain, sprain, or overuse injury, the pain is not only physical but psychological. Though it's easy to start feeling down when you can't invigorate yourself with your usual walk, run, or swim, don't fall into the "Why me?" trap. Inst...

When a young soccer player has a wheezing fit on the field, you can bet there's an extremely worried parent on the sidelines. What can a parent do when a child's favorite sport sets off asthma attacks? The natural reaction may be to pull him off the team and have him do something safer, like play video games. After all, no parent wants to hear a child wheeze and gasp. But before you make your ch...

The shoulder is the most flexible joint in your body. You take advantage of that flexibility every time you scratch your back, throw a ball, or stretch to reach the top shelf in the kitchen cabinets. Healthy shoulder joints allow you to move your arm into all sorts of positions, but this flexibility comes with a price: It's easy to push the joint farther than it should go, resulting in a strain, t...

What is "andro"? Short for androstenedione, andro is a hormone that became a star in the bodybuilding supplement industry in the nineties. The substance, a natural forerunner of both testosterone and estrogen, made headlines in 1998 when a reporter saw a bottle of the stuff in the locker of baseball star Mark McGwire. Encouraged by wild claims that andro could boost their testosterone levels by a...

What is creatine? Creatine is a natural compound that works like a gas pump for your muscles. The fuel from which muscle cells draw energy is a molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and creatine helps cells make new ATP to keep your tank from running low. Your kidneys, liver, and pancreas make about 1 to 2 grams of creatine every day, and most people get about that much daily from meat or...

What type of running shoes should I wear? Whether you're jogging at the gym or sprinting after a tennis ball, running puts tremendous stress on your feet. Finding a pair of good-fitting shoes that provide adequate support is the best thing you can do to protect them. If you're a serious runner who puts in at least several miles each week, you should definitely do your shoe shopping at a specialty ...

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