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Results for search "Health Care Access / Disparities".

Health News Results - 65

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Use of ambulances for non-emergency situations soared in New York City after the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new study finds.

With the advent of Obamacare -- and expanded access to Medicaid -- out-of-pocket costs for an ambulance dropped sharply for many people, making them more likely to ask for one in non-emergency situations, the research...

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even though the drug naloxone can be a lifesaving antidote to an opioid overdose, researchers in Philadelphia report that only a third of drugstores in that city carried it.

What's more, although Pennsylvania's standing order law for naloxone (common brand name: Narcan) allows pharmacists to dispense the drug without a doctor's prescription, ma...

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When people who are addicted to opioids make the difficult decision to quit, the last thing they need to face are barriers to treatment.

Yet, a new "secret shopper" study suggests most addicts seeking a prescription for buprenorphine -- which helps people stop using opioids -- would have trouble even getting an appointment with a doctor qualif...

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding Medicaid coverage after the Affordable Care Act seems to have narrowed U.S. racial differences in cancer treatment, a new study suggests.

Before the Affordable Care Act, blacks diagnosed with advanced cancer were 4.8 percentage points less likely than whites to get treatment within the month after diagnosis, the researchers said.

...

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what amounts to a double whammy for those living with HIV, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says these patients face higher heart risks but also major barriers to health care.

Three-quarters of people in the United States with HIV are older than 45 and have significant health problems at earlier ages than people without...

SUNDAY, June 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More American women under age 65 have been diagnosed sooner and treated earlier for ovarian cancer since the Affordable Care Act went into effect in 2010, new research shows.

And, more women received treatment within 30 days of diagnosis, improving their survival odds, the researchers said.

For the study, t...

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A solid minority of senior citizens still struggles to afford their prescription medications, a new government report shows.

About 5% of adults 65 and older don't take their medication as prescribed to cut costs, according to survey data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And nearly 1 in 5 seniors has ask...

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to opioid addiction treatments, money and race matter, researchers say.

White, wealthy Americans are much more likely to receive medication for their addiction than minorities and the poor, the new study found.

Racial and financial differences have only grown wider as the opioid crisis in the United States has worsene...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Need to see your doctor, but can't take time off from work? There's an app for that. And new research shows patients find the ability to see a doctor "virtually" convenient and satisfying.

Nine out of 10 people who had a virtual visit with a doctor said it was more convenient than other ways of getting care, and it addressed their medical n...

TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Popular workplace "wellness" programs may not offer a big payoff for workers' health or bosses' bottom lines -- at least in the short term, new research suggests.

In a study of one large U.S. company, researchers found that a wellness program led some workers to change their habits: Participants were more likely to say they were exercising a...

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer drug shortages don't appear to have a significant impact on chemotherapy treatment in the United States, according to a new study.

"These findings are surprising in light of the substantial media and policy attention that the cancer drug shortage problem has garnered," said study co-author Mireille Jacobson. She's an associate profes...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Older black American women are much less likely to be treated for heart attack and heart disease than white and Hispanic women, researchers say.

"Our study shows that black women still receive less recommended therapy for heart attacks and coronary heart disease than white women, and that improving these racial disparities is still needed," sa...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion under "Obamacare" may have quickly translated into fewer heart disease deaths among middle-aged Americans, a new study suggests.

In 2014, many U.S. states began expanding their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) -- making more lower-income residents eligible for coverage. It's known that those expanded pro...

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Folks who aren't covered by private insurance are much more likely to get booted out of the hospital early, a new study finds.

Uninsured patients were also more than twice as likely to be transferred to another hospital and 66% more likely to be discharged outright, compared with people with private insurance, the findings showed.

...

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that brings bad news as America struggles with an opioid epidemic, a new report shows that only four states provide adequate insurance coverage for addiction treatment.

"We are calling on states to ensure health plans cover the full range of effective addiction treatments and address the serious gaps identified in this report,"...

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- State Medicaid programs must do more to make sure that people at high risk for lung cancer are screened for the deadly disease, a new American Lung Association report says.

Medicaid is the public assistance program offering health care coverage for low-income Americans. Medicaid coverage for screening high-risk people varies widely between st...

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More American women had health insurance and access to care after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was fully in place in 2014, and poorest women benefited most, according to a new report.

For the study, researchers examined U.S. National Health Interview Survey data on insurance affordability, access to care and the use of preventive services --...

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Autism exacts a heavy toll on the families of teens who struggle with the disorder, but the fight to get treatment and services is even harder among minorities who live in poverty, new research suggests.

"We must understand that many families parenting teens on the autism spectrum are also struggling to make ends meet while trying to navigate...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia appears to strike people of different races in different ways, brain autopsies have revealed.

Hispanic and black people are more likely to suffer from dementia that's caused in part by micro-strokes or hardening of the arteries that serve the brain, researchers report.

On the other hand, whites are more likely to have deme...

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black neighborhoods in America's three largest cities are much more likely to be located in a "trauma desert," an area without immediate access to a designated trauma center, a new study finds.

Census data for neighborhoods in New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles revealed that neighborhoods made up of mostly black residents are more often 5...

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 4.2 million people worldwide die every year within 30 days of surgery -- more than from HIV, tuberculosis and malaria combined, a new study reports.

The findings show that 7.7 percent of all deaths worldwide occur within a month of surgery, a rate higher than that from any other cause except ischemic heart disease and stroke.

Ab...

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- One way to get better medical care and more value for your health care dollars is to find yourself a primary care provider, researchers say.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 70,000 U.S. adults who took part in a Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Of those, more than 49,000 had a primary care doctor and about 21,000 did not...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money worries may contribute to heart disease in black Americans, a new study suggests.

"Stress is known to contribute to disease risk, but the data from our study suggest a possible relationship between financial stress and heart disease that clinicians should be aware of as we research and develop interventions to address social determinan...

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's disease may be twice as common in black Americans as in whites, and scientists don't really know why.

But new research uncovers a clue that suggests that diagnosing the brain-robbing disease may not be the same for these two populations.

The study found that black people typically have lower levels of the brain protein tau...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite being slashed by half in recent months, the price tag for advanced cholesterol-fighting drugs is still too high to make them cost-effective, a new analysis has concluded.

In March, the manufacturer of alirocumab (Praluent) announced that it would cut the cost of the medication from $14,000 a year to $7,000.

But the price wo...

MONDAY, Dec. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who call 911 for a possible heart attack may get different treatment from paramedics than men do, a new U.S. study suggests.

Researchers found that ambulance crews were less likely to give recommended treatments, such as aspirin, to women with chest pain. Paramedics were also less likely to turn on their sirens while transporting female ...

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- On any given night in America, more than 550,000 people are homeless, and they are being hospitalized in greater numbers, a new study suggests.

Despite expanded Medicaid and increased funds for health care clinics, hospitalizations among this vulnerable population are rising, said lead researcher Dr. Rishi Wadhera. He is with the Smith Cent...

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- On the surface, the news looks good for America's mental health -- a new report shows the rate of people with serious psychological distress is declining, and more folks are seeking mental health care on an outpatient basis.

But the haves are edging out the have-nots when it comes to mental health care, a closer peek at the numbers reveals.

...

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans in states with the highest obesity rates are less likely to have weight-loss surgery, researchers say.

Why?

"None of the states with the five highest obesity rates crack the top 20 in terms of bariatric [weight-loss] surgery, and all but one are in the bottom 10 in terms of economic rank," said study co-author Dr. Eric DeM...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black women have the highest risk of life-threatening birth complications in the United States, a new study finds.

Compared to whites, black women had a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, the University of Michigan researchers reported.

"Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related emergency ...

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poor-quality health care results in about 5 million deaths a year in low- and middle-income countries, new research suggests.

And another 3.6 million deaths a year are caused by lack of access to care, the study found.

"Quality care should not be the purview of the elite, or an aspiration for some distant future; it should be the DNA...

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea is common -- but rarely diagnosed -- among black Americans, researchers say.

The new study included 852 black men and women, average age 63, in Jackson, Miss., who were participants in the Jackson Heart Sleep Study.

The investigators found that 24 percent of the study participants had moderate or severe sleep apnea, but o...

FRIDAY, Aug. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, may close a big gap in women's access to reproductive health care, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 1,200 women of childbearing age enrolled in Michigan's expansion of Medicaid for low-income adults, one in three said the expanded coverage improved her access...

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Differences in survival rates between rural and urban cancer patients may be due to the kind of care they receive, a review of cancer clinical trials contends.

Research has shown that cancer patients in rural areas have lower survival rates than those in urban areas. For example, cancer death rates between 2011 and 2015 were 180 per 100,000 pe...

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency treatment rarely allows you much time to consider your options. But what about care that can be done on your timetable?

There are many tools available to help you understand the pros and cons of nearly any procedure and -- through an open discussion with your health-care provider -- determine what's best for you.

Research s...

THURSDAY, July 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, heart disease can ruin a poor family financially even if they have health insurance, a new study finds.

One in four low-income families with someone suffering from coronary artery disease had out-of-pocket costs that were far beyond their means, researchers found. And these families were three times more likely than midd...

FRIDAY, June 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sticking with one primary care doctor may help you stay healthy and extend your life, according to a new British study.

Researchers reviewed 22 studies from nine countries with different cultures and health systems. Of those, 18 concluded that staying with the same doctor over time significantly reduced early deaths, compared with switching doct...

TUESDAY, June 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eight million people in less-developed countries die needlessly each year, and that loss of life strips $6 trillion from the economies of those nations, new research calculates.

If the rate of preventable deaths continues unchecked, those countries could lose $11 trillion in gross domestic product by 2030, the researchers reported.

"...

FRIDAY, June 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black men with advanced prostate cancer who get chemotherapy may live longer than white men, a new study suggests.

Data from nine trials including more than 8,000 men with advanced prostate cancer showed that survival for black men was initially the same as for white men -- an average of 21 months.

But after taking into account othe...

MONDAY, May 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease remains a major killer of the homeless, a new review confirms.

A combination of access to care, predicting who's at risk, and challenges of managing care all contribute to the increased odds of dying from cardiovascular disease among this population, researchers reported.

"Clinicians need to make a concerted effort to ov...

THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Where you live can have a major effect on your health, new research suggests.

Living in a diverse community where people are better educated, make more money and have good health care nearby is linked to greater well-being and a better quality of life, the study authors said.

"Our communities have a big impact on our health and wel...

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Undocumented immigrants in the United States are often denied treatment for kidney failure until they have a life-threatening emergency. Now a new study finds that the doctors and nurses who treat them are frustrated and demoralized over it.

At issue is access to treatment for end-stage kidney disease -- in which the kidneys can no longer perfo...

MONDAY, April 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Among heart failure patients, black people are much less likely than white people to have their care overseen by a cardiologist, a new study finds.

Previous research has shown that receiving care primarily from a cardiologist improves in-hospital survival rates for heart failure patients.

In the new study, researchers analyzed data ...

WEDNESDAY, April 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The racial gap between black and white Americans for dying early has narrowed, but opioid overdose deaths among whites might be fueling part of that otherwise positive trend.

The new findings stem from an analysis of death records between 1990 and 2014, which tracked "years of life lost," meaning the difference between an individual's proj...

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive a heart attack are less likely than men to receive cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that can reduce the risk of another heart attack or stroke, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 88,000 U.S. adults who filled a statin prescription after a heart attack in 2014-2015. Of those, 56 percent of men and 47 p...

FRIDAY, April 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Having a chronic heart condition is stressful enough, but new research suggests the cost of caring for the condition is also a huge financial burden for poorer families in the United States.

One in four low-income families carry a significant financial load from out-of-pocket expenses for chronic heart disease treatment. For one in 10 low-inco...

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medical care costs in the United States can be so overwhelming that Americans fear the cost of treatment more than the illness itself, a new poll shows.

"It's shocking and unacceptable that medical bills strike more fear in the hearts of Americans than serious illness," said Shelley Lyford.

She is president and CEO of West Health...

MONDAY, March 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- America's heart health went from bad to worse between 1988 and 2014, a new report warns.

That means roughly 60 percent of whites, 75 percent of Mexican Americans and 85 percent of black Americans are going through life today with subpar heart health.

At first glance, the study seems to offer some good news: A long-standing gap in he...

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of abortion services in the United States can hinge on where a woman lives, a new report shows.

The report from The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine found that while legal abortions in the United States are considered safe, many states have rules that limit a woman's access to a safe and effective abortion...

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your wallet takes a hit when you donate a kidney to save someone's life.

That could be the reason for a steady decline in U.S. kidney donations by men and by people in low-income households, a new study suggests.

The living kidney donation rate among men dropped by 25 percent between 2005 and 2015, but remained stable among women, ...