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Results for search "Kids' Ailments".

Health News Results - 139

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight preschoolers have twice the odds of developing high blood pressure by age 6, putting them at risk of heart attack and stroke later in life.

And those odds begin building as early as age 4, a new study reports.

"The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health pro...

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at an early age have slowed growth in brain areas linked to mild cognitive deficits, new research suggests.

The study compared MRIs of the brain in kids with type 1 diabetes to age-matched children without the condition. Researchers also saw that areas of slower brain growth were associated with higher...

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Concussions aren't only a concern for high school and college athletes -- they're also a leading injury risk for kids as young as age 5 who play sports.

That's the upshot of a new study of injury risk among 1,500 elementary school athletes in one Florida county. For the study, University of South Florida researchers focused on 5- to 11-year-o...

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Shingles isn't usually considered a kids' disease, but children can get this painful condition. Fortunately, the chickenpox vaccine can also protect them against it, a new study finds.

"The virus that causes chickenpox also causes shingles. It's pretty uncommon in kids, but we wanted to see what would happen to the rates of shingles among child...

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite an epidemic of childhood obesity, the cholesterol levels of American kids have been improving over the past 20 years, a new study shows.

Researchers found that since 1999, levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol among U.S. children and teens have declined, while levels of "good" HDL cholesterol have risen.

That's the good news, resea...

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana extracts appear to help children with autism, reducing their disruptive behavior while improving their social responsiveness, a new Israeli clinical trial reports.

Kids treated with either a whole-plant cannabis extract or a pure combination of cannabidiol (CBD) and THC experienced a significant improvement in their symptoms, co...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A type 2 diabetes drug for adults also controls blood sugar levels in children and teens with the disease, researchers report.

Type 2 diabetes is on the rise among children and teens, but they have fewer treatment choices than adults, the study authors said. Currently, the only drugs approved for treatment of children and teens with type 2 d...

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma inhalers can't do the job if they're not used correctly. And that's an issue for many children, U.S. researchers say.

"We know from past studies that both parents and children overestimate the ability of children to properly use their inhaler," said study author Dr. Anna Volerman, from the University of Chicago.

The study in...

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many children with asthma don't use their inhalers properly and don't get a full dose of medicine, researchers report.

They evaluated inhaler use among 113 children between the ages of 2 and 16 who were hospitalized for asthma. Such patients are at highest risk for complications and death from asthma.

At least one crucial step in in...

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 100 kids a day are rushed to U.S. emergency rooms after accidentally swallowing a toy piece, battery, magnet or other foreign object, according to new research.

That's almost twice as many as in the mid-1990s.

"The sheer number of these injuries is cause for concern," said Dr. Danielle Orsagh-Yentis, lead author of the study p...

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a classic Catch-22: While kids who play sports are more likely to suffer a concussion, they seem to recover faster if they had already spent a lot of time on the field.

So finds new research that discovered kids who played a sport for at least seven years and had experienced a concussion recovered more quickly than kids with less expe...

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For young athletes, focusing on only one sport at an early age ups their odds for injury, a new study warns.

Sixty million kids play organized sports. By age 14, a growing number of them specialize in one sport with the goal of a college scholarship or professional career.

Researchers analyzed surveys completed by 202 athletes at o...

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If the cacophony of children screaming and throwing tiny plastic balls everywhere hasn't prompted you to forgo ball pits, a new study may just send you scurrying for the door.

The research found that ball pits in physical therapy clinics -- and undoubtedly in public ball pits, too -- were awash in microbes, some potentially quite dangerous. ...

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As American kids pack on the pounds, the number of those with back pain is on the rise.

One in three between the ages of 10 and 18 said they had backaches in the past year, according to a survey of about 3,700 youngsters. The incidence rose along with kids' age and weight and was higher among those who play competitive sports.

Thou...

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with poorly controlled asthma struggle in school, especially those who are ethnic minorities, a new study reports.

Researchers evaluated asthma and allergy status, lung function and school performance of 216 black, Hispanic (Latino) and white children in a U.S. city.

Those with a greater number of daily asthma symptoms had more...

MONDAY, March 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An egg allergy is no joke, but some children who have it could safely eat eggs after immunotherapy treatment, a new study claims.

"Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies and usually appears in early childhood. It has significant risk for severe allergic reactions and negatively affects quality of life for children with the allerg...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have added to a growing body of evidence that skin plays a major role in food allergies.

Their study of 62 children with eczema found that those with food allergies had skin irregularities not present on others.

Those irregularities included a lack of structural proteins needed to retain moisture and produce an effecti...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The actual number of childhood cancer cases worldwide is nearly double the recorded number, a chilling new study finds.

"Our model suggests that nearly one in two children with cancer are never diagnosed and may die untreated," said study author Zachary Ward. He is a researcher at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Publ...

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with autism are more than twice as likely to have sleep problems than typical kids or those with other developmental delays, a new study reports.

Several factors profoundly affect the sleep of 2- to 5-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), said lead researcher Dr. Ann Reynolds. They are more likely to resist their bedtim...

THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Measles outbreaks across the United States -- including one in Washington state where 50 cases have now been identified -- have again shone the spotlight on parents who resist getting kids vaccinated.

These outbreaks are a clear sign of the fraying of "herd immunity," the overall protection found when a large majority of a population has beco...

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bouncing around at a trampoline park can be great fun, but a new study warns it can also be an invitation to sprains, strains and broken bones.

Nationwide, more than 100,000 emergency room visits were related to trampoline injuries in 2014, according to the latest data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Injuries that o...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could lead to more U.S. babies born with congenital heart defects, researchers say.

Specifically, they concluded that hotter temperatures may lead to as many as 7,000 additional cases between 2025 and 2035 in eight representative states: Arkansas, Texas, California, Iowa, North Carolina, Georgia, New York and Utah.

...

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fish oil did not improve asthma control in overweight/obese young people with uncontrolled disease, a new study shows.

It included 98 participants, aged 12 to 25, who had diagnosed asthma but poor asthma control, despite using a daily inhaled corticosteroid.

Three-quarters of the participants took four grams of fish oil a day for si...

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. emergency rooms routinely prescribe antibiotics to babies with the common viral lung infection bronchiolitis, counter to recommendations issued more than a decade ago, a new study finds.

Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization for U.S. babies in their first year of life. In bronchiolitis, the lung's small airways (bronchi...

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A program that maps out the genes of newborns has allowed researchers to identify risks for some inherited childhood conditions, many of which can be prevented.

The so-called BabySeq Project discovered that slightly more than 9 percent of infants carry genes that put them at risk for medical conditions as they reach childhood.

"The Ba...

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Schools that promote healthy eating may reduce kids' risk of obesity, new research finds.

Their study of nearly 600 middle schoolers in New Haven, Conn., found that such efforts limited increases in kids' body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight).

The efforts included nutrition newsletters for stude...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For many city-dwelling teens with asthma, their chronic lung disease may go undiagnosed and untreated, a new study finds.

According to a survey of more than 33,000 New York City high school students, 20 percent reported having asthma-like symptoms, but were not diagnosed with the illness.

The researchers...

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The return of measles made headlines in recent years, but it's not the only disease that poses a particular threat to kids that has experienced a resurgence.

Another is pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough because of the distinctive sound it causes as people experience severe coughing bouts.

An infection of the respiratory s...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Isolated and afraid, Erin Olivera cast about the internet looking for information about the mysterious paralysis that had stricken her 11-month-old son Lucian.

She found next to nothing. No clear reason why over the course of a weekend in 2012 her boy went from a happy active toddler to utterly immobile and barely able to breathe.

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Could an infection make your child or teen prone to mental health issues?

New research from Denmark suggests it's possible.

"The findings linking infections with mental disorders in the developing brain do add more knowledge to this growing field, showing that there exists an intimate connection between the body and the brain," sai...

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's a good chance that some cases of the mysterious polio-like illness seen recently in U.S. children may have been misdiagnosed, a new study reports.

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), which causes potentially life-threatening paralysis and primarily strikes children, has been recurring in the United States in every-other-year waves since 2014...

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A 6-year-old boy with severe asthma wasn't responding to the usual treatments. It was only when family members stopped smoking marijuana at home that his breathing got better, according to his doctor.

The boy's case shows that exposure to secondhand pot smoke can worsen asthma in children who have a marijuana allergy, a new study reports.

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The wheezy lung disease asthma is yet one more problem linked to excess weight in childhood, a new study suggests.

The research contends that as many as 10 percent of pediatric asthma cases in the United States could be avoided if childhood obesity were eliminated.

"There are very few preventable risk factors for asthma -- obesity ...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When young children have a bout of "stomach flu," parents often turn to probiotics for help. But two new clinical trials suggest they are wasting their money.

Researchers found that probiotic formulas showed no benefit for babies and preschoolers with acute gastroenteritis -- a common gut infection that causes diarrhea and vomiting.

...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Drug approvals for adults often require future studies in children, but many of these studies are never completed, a new analysis finds.

"More than 50 percent of all drugs approved by the FDA lack information on how to safely and effectively use the drug in children," said study author Dr. Florence Bourgeois, from the Pediatric Therapeutics an...

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 8 percent of American children have food allergies, and 1 in 5 of those kids suffers an allergic reaction severe enough to wind up in the hospital, a new study finds.

"Childhood food allergies are relatively common and should be taken seriously, with 1 in 5 having a reaction that takes them to the emergency room every year," said lead ...

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cases of a mysterious polio-like illness continue to mount in the United States, and health officials are scrambling to figure out the cause.

There are now 252 patients under investigation for acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an increase of 33 patients since last week, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization ...

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens who suffer a sports-related concussion should reduce, but not eliminate, physical and mental activity in the days after their injury, an American Academy of Pediatrics report says.

"Athletes absolutely need to take an immediate break from play after a concussion, but we find that, during the recovery process, it is best to e...

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) is ineffective in treating a rare, polio-like disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis in children, researchers are reporting.

In the United States, there have been 219 possible cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) reported so far this year, and 80 have been confirmed, according to the U.S. C...

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with summer birthdays, especially those who spend long hours playing on smartphones and tablets, might be at greater risk for vision problems, a new study suggests.

Nearsightedness, also called myopia, is on the rise worldwide. It's what eye doctors call a refractive error, meaning the eyes can't focus light properly. The result: Close ob...

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism or developmental delays may be at increased risk for obesity, a new study finds.

The study included nearly 2,500 2- to 5-year-olds in the United States. Of those, 668 children had autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 914 had developmental delays; and a control group of 884 children had neither.

Compared to the contro...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The number of genes known to be associated with autism now stands at 102, researchers report.

They also said that they've made significant progress in distinguishing between genes associated with autism and those associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay, conditions that often overlap with autism.

The analysi...

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A rare but devastating polio-like virus appears to have made itself at home in the United States, partially paralyzing hundreds of children.

There have been 127 cases reported in 22 states so far this year, with 62 confirmed as acute flaccid myelitis, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, head of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Dis...

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children with asthma are at increased risk for childhood obesity, a new study suggests.

Obesity is widely regarded as a risk factor for asthma, but these new findings suggest the reverse is true, too, according to the researchers.

The study authors analyzed data from more than 21,000 children in nine European countries who were diagn...

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- School is in full swing, and with it comes a plethora of colds passed back and forth among kids.

But parents who want to alleviate a sick child's misery would do best to avoid over-the-counter cough and cold remedies.

Decongestants should not be given to children younger than 6 because there's no evidence that they do any good, acc...

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteria in a toddler's mouth might help predict later obesity, new research suggests.

Scientists at Penn State University found the composition of microorganisms in the mouths of 2-year-olds offers clues to the child's future weight.

"One in three children in the United States is overweight or obese," said the study's senior autho...

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poor nutrition increases a child's risk of high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed national health survey data for 2007 to 2014 from more than 7,200 U.S. kids between 8 and 17 years of age.

More than one-fifth lacked good access to nutritious foods, and more than 12 percent overall had high blood pressure.

...

MONDAY, Sept. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- All children 6 months of age and older should have a flu shot, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says.

A flu shot significantly reduces a child's risk of severe illness and flu-related death, according to the policy statement published online Sept. 3 in the journal Pediatrics.

"The flu virus is common -- and unpredictab...

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation therapy for the most common childhood brain tumor can cause memory problems, new research suggests.

Specifically, it can leave young survivors struggling to create memories of recent personal events, the small study found. But survivors' ability to recall ones that happened before radiation wasn't affected.

"There are some...

MONDAY, July 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many children are prescribed powerful opioid painkillers they don't really need, putting them and those around them at risk, a new study shows.

More than one in 10 kids enrolled in Tennessee's Medicaid program received an opioid prescription each year between 1999 and 2014, even though they did not have a severe condition requiring powerful pa...

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Wellness Library Results - 93

It wasn't that long ago that a California man in his mid-30s walked into a doctor's office with such astronomical levels of lead in his blood that he was barred from returning to work. Alarmed, health officials began looking into his workplace, the Alco Iron and Scrap Metal Co. in San Leandro, California. What they found at Alco was shocking: So much lead dust permeated the plant's atmosphere that...

What is Lyme disease? Lyme disease is an infection that your child can get if he's bitten by a tick carrying certain bacteria. Doctors call it the "great imitator" because it mimics other diseases, making it difficult to diagnose; in addition, a blood test can't confirm it until about three weeks following the bite. Left untreated, the infection can develop into a serious long-lasting illness th...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

What is swimmer's ear? It's an ear infection that kids and adults commonly get by swimming in a pool or lake. Water seeps into the ear canal and erodes its protective lining, making it easier for bacteria and fungi to take hold and multiply. Any infection of the external ear -- that is, in or near the ear canal, as opposed to the middle ear -- is categorized as swimmer's ear. How could my child ...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

A few hundred years ago, doctors believed baby teeth could be deadly. In one year alone in 19th-century England, more than 5,000 babies supposedly died of teething. Today, we know that teething isn't really dangerous. New teeth can make your baby cranky and uncomfortable, but the misery will soon pass. Here's what you need to know to help both of you get through this trying time. How can I tell ...

What causes allergies? Every human body carries an arsenal of chemicals to fight off bacteria, viruses, and other intruders, but sometimes these weapons backfire. If your child has allergies, she responds to things in the environment that are not invaders. The body produces antibodies, and when your child is exposed to the irritant a second time, her body releases a number of chemicals. One of th...

There are things we just don't talk about in polite company. There are subjects one doesn't broach at the dinner table. Take bodily vermin, for example. A few months ago, I couldn't have pictured myself sipping a post-prandial cup of coffee and Sambuca at a friend's house, chitchatting about the efficacy of various techniques for ridding one's household of lice and their dastardly offspring, nits,...

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

What should I do if my child breaks a bone or dislocates a joint? A broken bone or dislocated joint is a serious injury that requires a doctor's immediate attention. The best thing you can do is protect the injured area, making sure your child doesn't worsen the damage. Fractures are breaks, cracks, or chips in a bone. A fractured bone that pierces through the skin is called an open fracture. ...

If you're preparing for an international adoption, you're probably knee-deep in paperwork, waiting to be matched, or scheduling a flight for China, Russia, India, or another country to meet your new son or daughter for the first time. With all the excitement, medical tests for your child after you return home may be the last thing on your mind. But once you get home, it should be high on your li...

What are mumps? Caused by a virus that infects the salivary glands near the jawbone, mumps is a highly contagious illness that shows up mainly in swelling and soreness in the jaw area. The swelling is usually on both sides, so that the sufferer bears a passing resemblance to a chipmunk. In some cases, though, one side may puff up several days before the other. Your child may run a fever and compl...

Consider the standards used to diagnose oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and you may think they could describe any kid on a bad day -- and almost any teenager almost every day: They argue with adults, deliberately annoy people, defy rules, and have high fits of temper. All these activities are all-too-familiar to parents. The distinction lies in the frequency and intensity of the behavior. F...

What is croup? Croup is a common childhood infection marked by labored breathing and hoarse coughing. It's most likely to show up in toddlers, but it can occur at any age. Croup usually begins as a respiratory infection, and a child may have a runny nose for several days before beginning to cough. If your child has croup, her airways will probably become sore and swollen, making it hard for her ...

At one time or another, almost every child will refuse to take a pill or swig of medicinal syrup. Here are some tips to help the medicine go down:

  • Be honest. Do not tell your child that the medicine is candy (he might suddenly crave a handful). Instead, explain that the medicine is very important and that you will find some way to help him to take it.
  • If liquids are the only opt...

What is diaper rash? By the time your child reaches the toddler years, you've probably already seen your share of diaper rashes: red, inflamed skin hiding under the diaper or training pants. The rash -- usually found in the genital area, the inner thighs, or the buttocks -- can be either dry or moist. Sometimes the rash looks pimply, making the expression "smooth as a baby's bottom" seem like a ...

How can I tell if my child's too sick for daycare? It's not always easy. Obviously you don't want your kid to pass a phlegmy cough along to all his pals, but it's a much harder call when he has nothing more than a runny nose. In general, you shouldn't bring your child to daycare if the illness is contagious and could do anything more than make any youngster a little cranky. Here are some spe...

What is a middle ear infection? A middle ear infection is simply an invasion of viruses or bacteria into the small space that lies just beyond the eardrum. The germs usually stage the assault while a child is recovering from a cold or flu, ailments that leave her ears partly clogged with fluids and create an ideal habitat for microbes. As the infection takes hold, the middle ear fills with pus, a...

Can children get type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes used to be practically unheard of in people under 30. That explains the other common name for the disease: adult-onset diabetes. Not long ago, almost all children with diabetes suffered from the type 1 form of the disease, which means their bodies couldn't produce enough insulin. And type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas may produce normal insulin...

Once upon a time not so long ago, in a land very close to home, children faced bleak prospects when it came to learning about and coping with type 1 diabetes. Stern lectures from clinicians and educators, do's and don'ts imposed by parents, secrecy borne of fear that peers would shun them. By comparison, eating spinach or visiting the dentist was a breeze. Today, however, high-tech tools make kids...

What is bulimia nervosa? Although this eating disorder is less well-known than anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa is actually more common among American teenage and young women -- and just as serious. Bulimia nervosa, or simply "bulimia," is often referred to as "bingeing and purging." In other words, people with this eating disorder go on wild eating binges, consuming between 1,000 and 20,000 cal...

Choking is a serious threat to people of all ages. Whenever something gets stuck in the throat -- a piece of food, a child's toy, or blood from an injury -- it can block a person's air supply. After four to six minutes without air, the brain begins to die. If someone is choking, quick action can save a life. How can you tell if someone is choking? A choking victim will often put both hands on his...

In 1994, Kurt Cobain took his life at the age of 27. Like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, and other rock stars who died young before him, Cobain has achieved a youthful immortality in which his memory endures as symbol more than man. As the reluctant poster child for Seattle's early-'90s grunge rock explosion, Cobain never adjusted to his enormous fame as leader of the band Nirvana. His ...

It was just another Monday morning, the beginning of a normal school week, when 15-year-old Charles Andrew Williams whipped out a .22-caliber revolver in the bathroom of his high school in Santee, California, and unleashed a barrage of fire at the students around him. By the time police responded, two of the troubled teen's classmates were killed and 13 wounded in the ensuing melee. Tragically, th...

How can I tell if my child has a stuttering problem? Everybody has trouble speaking from time to time. We've all filled sentences with "um" or "uh" or stumbled through a nerve-wracking speech. But when a child has a stuttering problem, words can be a daily struggle. Stuttering usually starts between the ages of 2 and 5, but it can arise anytime before the teenage years. Watch for these signs: ...

Shortly after meeting their new baby, many parents will take a quick look for birthmarks. They may find a mole, a red splotch, or a patch of skin that's a different color from the rest of the body. Birthmarks come in several different varieties, most of them harmless and easy to ignore. Some marks fade away over the years, and others, if desired, can often be removed or concealed. There are two...

They poke, they complain, they have a strange need to use the restroom every 20 minutes, and they have almost no sense of time and distance -- in short, young kids are not always ideal companions on a long car trip. Then again, what fun is a family vacation if you don't take the family? In minivans and station wagons across the country, parents doing what they can to keep everyone safe and sane on...

Mongolian spots -- more properly called slate grey nevi -- are very common birthmarks. They are flat and bluish-gray, almost bruise-like. You might be concerned if such a mark show up on your baby, but there's really no reason to worry. Mongolian spots don't hurt, and they won't get any worse as a child gets older. In fact, they often fade over time. By the time your child is in grade school, ther...

Whooping cough (pertussis) is a disease that should be rare by now. We've had an effective vaccine against whooping cough for decades, but the illness continues to thrive. In 2009, 17,000 cases were reported in the United States among people of all ages, and many more cases go unreported. In fact, an unusual whooping cough outbreak in California in 2010 sickened more than 6,000 infants and kille...

The typical arthritis sufferer has at least a few gray hairs, a wrinkle here and there, and joints that have started to wear out after decades of use. But not every person with arthritis fits that profile. Some forms of arthritis can strike children or even infants. Arthritis may seem like a cruel fate for a young person, but many children cope admirably with their disease. With treatment and supp...

What should I do if my child gets something stuck in her ear or nose? Stay calm, and reassure her that it's no big deal. If the object is clearly visible and soft or flexible enough to be removed easily, grasp it with a pair of tweezers and gently pull it out. Never attempt to remove an object with a cotton swab or household items such as matches or toothpicks; you could end up pushing it farther...

What's the best way to treat a sunburn? For starters, make sure your child drinks plenty of water; he's probably dehydrated from being out in the sun. To soothe the sunburned area, apply a cold washcloth or let your child soak in a cool bath. (Adding baking soda or Aveeno colloidal oatmeal to the water can make it more soothing.) Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can also ease the pain. Avoid using pe...

How can I tell if my child has poison oak, ivy, or sumac? Many substances can cause an allergic reaction called contact dermatitis. But if your child has been playing in areas where poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac grows, you can consider the plant a likely culprit. An allergic reaction, marked by redness, itchiness, and swelling, usually shows up 12 to 48 hours after contact, but can take...

How do I stop a nosebleed? First, have your child sit or stand up to reduce the blood pressure in the veins of the nose so that bleeding slows. Have him lean forward and spit out any blood. For a young child, gently pinch the nose shut near the tip with a tissue or clean washcloth, using your thumb and index finger to hold it closed. (Older children can do this themselves.) Remind your child to b...

CPR -- cardiopulmonary resuscitation -- is a potentially life-saving procedure that can restart a person's heartbeat and breathing. CPR is often used to revive victims of electric shock, near-drowning, and heart attack. According to the National Institutes of Health, quick CPR can triple a victim's chances for survival. The best way to learn the technique is to take a certified training class. (Se...

What are canker sores? They're small, painful, crater-like nuisances that sprout on the tongue or on the inside of the cheeks. The sores are usually white, gray, or yellowish with a red rim and last up to two weeks. (Some people confuse them with cold sores, which form blisters instead of craters and usually show up on or around the lips.) Canker sores are most common in teenagers and women, but ...

You know you need to brush your teeth and floss every day. But do you know how to get the most out of it? Even if you think you mastered brushing and flossing in grade school, you may still have a few things to learn. What kind of toothbrush should I buy? America is a world leader in toothbrush technology. Walk through the oral hygiene aisle of a grocery store, and you'll discover many innovatio...

Why does my child have a sore throat? In children, a sore throat is almost always due to an infection. A host of bacteria and viruses can cause this common condition, also known as pharyngitis. Irritants such as cigarette smoke can also cause a sore throat. Is a sore throat ever serious? Most sore throats are harmless. Swollen glands, ear infection, and congestion can accompany sore throat, bu...

The first month of life is a steep learning curve for both the new baby and the new parents. In even a few short weeks, your baby will have come a long way from the moment he was born. Your baby starts life with more than 70 separate reflexes. Reflexes are instinctive, rather than learned, behaviors, and many will gradually fade away in the coming months. Two of the most important inborn skills ...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in ways that are defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous, you want to show him that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it also delivers other messages you don't want to be sent:

Lynn White, an assistant professor of research at Northeast Ohio University's College of Medicine, recently got a surprise when she tried to pick up her son's middle-school backpack. The pack didn't look unusually full, but it weighed somewhere in between a bowling-ball bag and a sack of bricks. "I thought 'Oh my gosh, I can't even put this on the table,'" she says. Modern backpacks are designed ...

What is strep throat? Strep throat is a bacterial throat infection marked by swelling and extreme soreness of the back of the throat, or pharynx. It can hurt so much your child doesn't want to swallow. (The name "strep throat" is a shorthand term for the throat infection, which is caused by Group A streptococcus bacteria.) Other symptoms of strep are fever (often above 101 degrees), chills, decre...

How can I tell if my child has a stuttering problem? The mind of a toddler is buzzing with questions, commands, and mangled lyrics to "Sesame Street" songs. Your child is probably still learning how to turn his thoughts into intelligible sounds, and mistakes are bound to happen. He may pepper his speech with "um" and "uh" or frequently repeat words or phrases ("Hey, hey, hey, hey, Mom. Can I, uh,...

When should my child start brushing? Clean your child's very first teeth by rubbing them gently with a damp piece of gauze. But when the first molars come in, usually by the age of ten months, it's time to start daily brushing. Use a soft-bristled brush and water. Move the brush back and forth gently in short strokes, making sure you reach the front, back, and chewing surfaces of all teeth. Be ex...

What is Roseola? Roseola, or roseola infantum, is a fairly mild childhood disease that causes fever and a rash. Sometimes called "baby measles," it typically strikes children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. It's caused by the human herpes virus 6, a cousin of the viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes. What are the symptoms? Roseola generally starts with a moderate to hig...

Anxiety is a normal part of children's behavioral and emotional development, and as children get older, their concerns grow broader. Your child may be worried about a spelling test, a soccer match, or riding the school bus for the first time. These anxieties are common, even signs that your child's development is on track. Why is my child so anxious? As children get older, they subject themselve...

By now your child has reached elementary school age and you feel pretty well in tune with his personality -- his shyness is just part of the package. Still, you wonder how you can make life easier for him. The key is to avoid the two opposing -- and perhaps equally strong -- temptations to pressure and overprotect him. Trying to get him to be more outgoing will only make him retreat. And shelterin...

What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder? ADHD (commonly known as ADD) is a behavioral disorder. Basically, children who have it are unable to concentrate, excessively active, or both. The American Psychiatric Association calls the distinct types "inattentive" and "hyperactive-impulsivity." Some kids with attention deficit disorder repeatedly fail to finish tasks, get distracted easily, a...

What is sickle cell anemia? Sickle cell anemia is a disease of red blood cells that is passed from parent to child. Normally red blood cells contain a protein called hemoglobin A, which carries oxygen to all the organs in the body. With sickle cell anemia, however, the body makes a different kind of protein, called hemoglobin S. The problem is that when a red blood cell with hemoglobin S relea...

What are the sinuses? The sinuses are four sets of air-filled cavities located behind and around the nose and eyes. Many people (adults as well as children) only become aware of these spaces when they begin hurting, so they may not appreciate their value. Sinuses make a person's skull lighter (so that we can hold our head up) and filter out many irritating airborne particles in the air that's br...

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