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Results for search "Child Psychology".

Health News Results - 64

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a young child involved in organized sports may have a mental health payoff down the line, according to a new study.

Kids who had participated in athletic programs between ages 6 and 10 had less emotional distress, anxiety and shyness by age 12. They were also less likely to suffer from social withdrawal, researchers found.

"Th...

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win.

Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it's never too late to correct the behavior, even if it's a wel...

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus patients who had difficult childhoods have higher disease activity, worse depression and poorer overall health than those with better childhoods, a new study finds.

Bad childhood experiences included abuse, neglect and household challenges.

The study included 269 lupus patients in California. Of those, about 63% reported at ...

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although autism is typically diagnosed around age 3 or 4, new research suggests it can be spotted soon after a child's first birthday.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorders early is "extremely important because the brain is really plastic during early development," said the study's lead author, Karen Pierce.

The study found that 8...

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Acad...

MONDAY, April 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide attempts and talk about suicide are rising alarmingly among America's kids, with emergency departments seeing a near doubling of cases over less than a decade, a new study reveals.

Among children aged 5 to 18, suicidal thoughts and attempts led to more than 1.1 million ER visits in 2015 -- up from about 580,000 in 2007, according to an...

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and teens is higher if they think their response to a traumatic event is abnormal, a new study indicates.

Most kids fully recover after a traumatic event, such as a car accident. But some develop PTSD that may endure for months, years or even into adulthood, according to resea...

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Abuse during childhood can cause structural changes in the brain that increase a person's risk of severe and recurrent depression, a new study reveals.

The findings "add further weight to the notion that patients with clinical depression who were mistreated as children are clinically distinct" from people who didn't suffer such trauma in ea...

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking about a TV for your young child? Based on new evidence, you might want to reconsider that.

Preschoolers who had a TV in their bedroom were at increased risk for poor eating habits, overweight/obesity and social/emotional struggles in their teens, Canadian researchers say.

"The early years are a critical period in a child's...

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obese kids may have extra difficulty with schoolwork and coping under stress, a preliminary study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 23,000 parents, researchers found that kids who were obese were less likely to show certain indicators of "flourishing," versus their normal-weight peers.

That meant less engagement in schoolwork and learni...

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Can violent video games push some kids to act violently in real life? A new research review suggests the answer is "yes."

The analysis combined the results of 24 past studies, involving more than 17,000 children and teenagers. Overall, researchers found, kids who played video games featuring fighting, attacks and killing were somewhat more like...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two-minute exercise breaks in the classroom may help school children meet physical activity goals without disrupting learning, new research suggests.

University of Michigan researchers say short bursts of in-classroom activity can trim childhood obesity rates while helping elementary schools provide 30 minutes of daily exercise for student...

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- By fourth grade, girls in the United States read and write better than boys, a new study reveals.

Australian researchers found this gender achievement gap appears in standardized tests and worsens over time.

"The common thinking is that boys and girls in grade school start with the same cognitive ability, but this research sugge...

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Time spent reading to toddlers or having "conversations" with them helps boost their intelligence and thinking skills, even a decade later, new research shows.

The study found that the more "conversational turns" that occurred in a toddler's day, the better children performed on tests that measure IQ, language skills and thinking skills in m...

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Students gain when teachers focus on positive behavior.

So say British researchers who examined the impact of a program designed to train teachers to build strong social relationships with their students. They're encouraged to ignore minor bad behavior, and acknowledge good behavior.

The program resulted in improved student behavi...

TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who constantly use their smartphones may have a heightened risk of developing symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a new study suggests.

The findings offer a look at a question many parents may have: Can those ubiquitous digital devices -- and their constant pull on kids' attention -- cause mental or behavioral issu...

TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children who abuse animals may have been abused themselves, a new study suggests.

Kids aged 10 and up who intentionally hurt animals are two to three times more likely to have been abused than kids who treat animals with respect, said the British researchers who conducted the review.

"Asking about a history of animal abuse in a safe...

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are supposed to screen young children to see if they're learning basic skills. But only 17 percent of kids get this critical testing in some places in the United States, a new study finds.

Overall, fewer than one-third of U.S. children under 3 years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems, said researchers at John ...

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Overcontrolling moms and dads -- so-called "helicopter" parents -- can stunt their children's emotional development, new research warns.

Directing every move a toddler makes may undermine a child's ability to manage their emotions and behavior on their own, explained Nicole Perry, lead author of a new study.

"We found that overcontro...

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. pediatricians say spanking is a bad way to discipline children.

"In the past couple of decades, a tremendous amount of research has come out that shows hitting children is counterproductive and leads to more harm than good," said Catherine Taylor, author of a new survey on the subject.

"I hope that pediatricians will recogn...

WEDNESDAY, May 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to kids and medical procedures like needles, expectation is everything.

If they think the shot will hurt, it probably will, a new study finds. On the flip side, if they're coaxed not to expect a lot of pain, they may feel it less.

"We know that expectation affects pain experience in adults; we don't know whether this ...

WEDNESDAY, May 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Extra pounds in early childhood may do more than put a child's physical health at risk -- they might result in a slightly lower IQ, new research suggests.

The study found that "non-lean" children tended to score lower on an intelligence quotient (IQ) test years later, particularly in the areas of reasoning and working memory.

But...

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's generally assumed that suicide is more common among white kids in the United States than their black peers. But that's not the case among 5- to 12-year-olds, new research shows.

Black children in that young age group are about twice as likely to take their own lives as whites, the researchers found.

For older kids, the picture r...

TUESDAY, May 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A vast majority of U.S. adults believe children should receive more mental health support, new research reveals.

Nearly nine out of 10 adults favor more mental health treatment and prevention programs for children and teens in their communities, according to a poll commissioned by Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

"The...

TUESDAY, April 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents, you may be able to stop feeling guilty about letting your toddlers play video games -- as long as you're playing with them.

That's the suggestion of a small study on the effects of touchscreen technology on kids' development. The research dovetails with growing concern that toddlers might be harmed as technology takes center stage ...

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who, as young kids, either bullied their siblings or were bullied themselves by siblings face an increased risk for psychotic disorders, a new British study suggests.

By age 18, those who'd been either the victim or the bully several times a week or month were two to three times more likely to have a psychotic disorder, such as schizoph...

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As if preemies didn't face enough struggles, a new study finds they have more difficulty making friends, though things improve once they start school.

"Having friends, playing with them and being accepted is important for social support and personal well-being," said study leader Dieter Wolke. He's a psychology professor at the University of W...

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You should alert authorities if you suspect a child is being hurt or is in danger, a child abuse expert says.

The issue is in the spotlight with the recent arrest of David and Louise Turpin, the California couple accused of abusing their 13 children for years.

Members of the public can report concerns anonymously, which is what happen...

MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's said that a positive attitude can help kids do better in math. Now, a new study shows how that connection adds up in the brain.

"Attitude is really important," said lead author Lang Chen, a postdoctoral scholar in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University. "Based on our data, the unique contribution of positive attitude to...

MONDAY, Jan. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When children learn they have a long-term illness, such as diabetes or epilepsy, they're likely to suffer emotionally, too, a small study finds.

These mental health issues surface soon after the diagnosis, the Canadian researchers said.

Surveying 50 kids with a chronic illness and their parents, the study authors found anxiety disor...

MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents aren't the only ones worried about their kids' smartphone habits. Some big Apple investors want the iPhone developer to make it easier for Mom and Dad to manage their children's phone time.

Apple also needs to explore potential mental health effects of smartphone overuse, says a letter sent to the technology giant this weekend by Jana ...

FRIDAY, Dec. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Santa's sleigh may be brimming with toys, but some experts say an excess of dolls, trucks and other playthings can overwhelm a child.

Instead of giving more toys this holiday season, think about giving children memory-creating experiences such as lessons or family outings, the experts suggest.

"Toy overload is real, and something we ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose families regularly eat meals together tend to have better social skills and fitness levels, researchers report.

Family meals yield multiple physical and mental health benefits, according to the long-term Canadian study.

"The presence of parents during mealtimes likely provides young children with firsthand social int...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Mental illness caused by traumatic experiences in early childhood may be passed from mothers to their daughters, new research suggests.

The study involved adults whose parents had been evacuated from Finland during World War II, when they were children.

Many of the approximately 49,000 children evacuated from Finland from 1941 to ...

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's a new sign of mental distress among American girls: Nearly 20 percent more young teen and preteen females have sought emergency room treatment for poisoning, cutting or harming themselves yearly since 2009, research shows.

Girls ages 10 to 14 had an 18.8 percent increase per year in treatment for self-inflected injuries -- the sharpes...

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Boys tend to pay more attention in school when there are girls around, and new research suggests it's not just about how the girls look.

The study found that young men got better reading marks in school when they were outnumbered by young women in the classroom.

Researchers reviewed the reading test scores of more than 200,000 15-yea...

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were spanked as kids may face heightened risk of certain mental health problems, a new study suggests.

The study found that those who were spanked were more likely to have abused drugs or attempted suicide.

And that was with other factors -- including more severe physical or emotional abuse -- taken into account.

<...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As if the idea of teen cyberbullying isn't harrowing enough, a new study warns of a strange twist in which kids anonymously post hurtful messages -- to themselves.

The worry is that this digital self-harm -- like traditional self-harm -- may be a harbinger for suicide down the road, the study authors said.<...

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Mass slayings, like the church shooting in Texas Sunday that left at least 26 dead, are hard enough for adults to comprehend. For children, these tragedies can make the world seem like a terrifying place.

In the wake of such bloodshed, a New Jersey family physician offers guidance to parents trying to help children manage their fears.

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The kids aren't alright, many American adults believe.

More than two-thirds of adults think children today are less healthy than previous generations of youngsters, and more than 75 percent believe kids' mental health is also worse, a new survey finds.

"Our findings clash with the American dream of expecting that the quality of life w...

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A teenage school shooter may be attempting to prove his masculinity.

So says an Oregon researcher who analyzed the traits shared by 31 boys involved in 29 mass shootings at U.S. schools.

The attacks occurred between 1995 and 2015, and the killers ranged in age from 11 to 18 years old. The total number of dead: 58.

Boys who ...

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Teen girls are much more likely to self-harm than boys, and the dangerous practice is on the rise.

That's the conclusion of a new British study that also found a strong link between self-harm -- practices such as cutting or burning oneself -- and a higher risk of suicide.

Researchers reviewed information from nearly 650 general pra...

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who struggle to get their children to follow a healthy diet may want to make dinnertime a pleasant experience, new research suggests.

The study found a happier emotional atmosphere during meals allows preschoolers to make healthier food choices.

"Having more positive mealtimes, where people are enjoying themselves, where th...

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all children in the United States face traumatic experiences that can radically alter the course of their lives, research shows.

But Big Bird, Elmo and Cookie Monster are now joining the effort to help these kids.

A new program launched by Sesame Workshop aims to help youngsters cope with natural disasters like Hurrican...

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A child's inability to laugh with others could point to psychopathic behavior later, a new study suggests.

Most people find it natural to join in when they see or hear others laughing, the researchers noted. But laughter isn't contagious for boys at risk of developing psychopathy later in life, the researchers found.

"Those social c...

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Grit and determination are not necessarily ingrained. Rather, they're qualities learned from a very young age, a new lab experiment demonstrates.

Children as young as 15 months old learn tenacity from watching their parents, and will try harder after watching an adult struggle to succeed at a task, said lead researcher Julia Leonard.

...

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The asthma medication Singulair (montelukast) appears linked to neuropsychiatric side effects, such as depression, aggression, nightmares and headaches, according to a new review by Dutch researchers.

But experts aren't yet ready to pull the plug on this class of medication.

"In our study, we give prescribing physicians the advi...

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cyberbullying starts early, and 8- and 9-year-olds with cellphones are especially vulnerable, new research finds.

"Parents often cite the benefits of giving their child a cellphone, but our research suggests that giving young children these devices may have unforeseen risks as well," said study researcher Elizabeth Englander, a professor of p...

FRIDAY, Aug. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- With school bells ringing once again, 1 in 3 U.S. parents admits to worrying about bullying and cyberbullying.

A new poll involving more than 1,500 parents of children and teens found one-third very concerned about online bullying and how it could affect their child's mental health.

Experts have warned about the link between cyberbu...

THURSDAY, Aug. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral therapy for children with autism also benefits their parents, a new study finds.

About 70 percent of children with autism have emotional or behavioral problems and may turn to cognitive behavioral therapy to help with these issues.

Usually, while kids are with the therapist, parents are in a separate room learning what t...

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Wellness Library Results - 64

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, you want to show him his behavior is unacceptable and must change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages you don't want to send:

Why does my child have tantrums? Some preschoolers throw tantrums for the same reasons they did as toddlers: because they're exhausted, hungry, or scared. But at this age it's more likely because your child wants to test your authority or manipulate you. This isn't a knock on your parenting skills or a sign that he'll be a rebellious teenager; it's a normal part of his development and growing ind...

How can I stop my child from teasing? The short answer is you can't. Every child teases, from the peekaboo of infancy to the "I'm going to get you!" round-the-sofa chases of early childhood. But you can stop your child from teasing too much or too harshly. Try giving your child these simple dos and don'ts:

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? The best course is to help him develop his emotional intelligence (loosely defined as the ability to cope with one's own feelings as well as those of others). This will enable him to sense when his teasing is mean-spirited, hostile, or simply inappropriate. Here are some tips:

Why does my child bite his nails? Children bite their nails for many reasons -- out of curiosity or boredom, to relieve stress, to pass the time, or from force of habit. Nail biting is the most common of the so-called "nervous habits," which include thumb sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and tooth grinding. (None of these necessarily signals anxiety, so "nervous habits" is somethi...

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

Consider the standards used to diagnose oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and you may think they could describe any kid on a bad day -- and almost any teenager almost every day: They argue with adults, deliberately annoy people, defy rules, and have high fits of temper. All these activities are all-too-familiar to parents. The distinction lies in the frequency and intensity of the behavior. F...

Why does my child constantly interrupt me? Until they reach the age of 3 or 4, children think that the world and everything in it (including their parents) exist for their benefit. Not only that but their short-term memory isn't well developed, which means your child's impulse to say things right now before she forgets actually has a physiological basis. Therefore, the very concept of interruptin...

It's not easy being a toddler. One moment your child feels as if he's king of the world; the next he's crying in rage and hurling a toy across the room. Like many parents, you may find it hard to cope with your toddler's outbursts of anger and frustration. But these times actually provide the best opportunities to teach a young child how to manage strong feelings and calm himself down. By helpin...

It was spring of 1999, and Joshua Watson, a sixth-grader at Alvarado Intermediate School in Alvarado, Texas, had an unsettling decision to make -- whether to accept a five-day in-school suspension or be struck three times with a paddle. His offense: earning his 10th demerit point for forgetting to bring pencils to class. Joshua was getting good grades and didn't want to fall behind. So, with the c...

How can I tell if my child has a stuttering problem? Everybody has trouble speaking from time to time. We've all filled sentences with "um" or "uh" or stumbled through a nerve-wracking speech. But when a child has a stuttering problem, words can be a daily struggle. Stuttering usually starts between the ages of 2 and 5, but it can arise anytime before the teenage years. Watch for these signs: ...

In the first month of life, your baby's social life revolves around you. She's already familiar with your voice, which she could hear from inside the womb. One of her first images is likely to be your face as she is brought to the breast (or bottle). At her age, all she needs for optimum emotional and social development is an attentive parent, lots of touch, and love. Your baby may spend so much...

This is the month for motion. Sitters become scooters, and scooters become crawlers. A baby who used to be glued to floor can suddenly go just about anywhere she wants, if she has the time and determination. She might even be able to pull herself up on a coffee table or couch, opening all sorts of new possibilities for exploration and mischief. You can encourage her new skills by giving her plen...

Not long ago, your baby was far too bewildered to have much of a social life. It's hard to connect with people when you have no idea who they are. Now she's really starting to notice people, and she likes what she sees. She's crying less and smiling more, especially when you come into view. She might even let out a full-bellied laugh when you play with her. She's becoming more active, more engagin...

Your baby used to live in his own little world, but he's quickly turning into a social butterfly. He's starting to join in conversations, and he uses sounds and gestures to encourage you to pick him up and play with him. (If he doesn't seek attention in these ways, be sure to tell his doctor or nurse practitioner.) He's just beginning to realize that people will respond to his actions. And the res...

For the first couple of months, the relationship with your baby was a one-way street. You gave her love and attention, and she soaked it in. She could smile and cry, but she never really tried to connect with you or the other people in her life. Now, in her fourth month, the relationship is finally starting to flow in two directions. She has the brainpower to know what she wants, and she's finding...

Your baby has a lot on his mind. Now that he's moving around, he faces all sorts of new decisions and dilemmas. Which part of the house should he explore next? What's the best way to get there? And what should he do once he arrives? He's also thinking harder about the world around him and his place in it. Even when he makes bad decisions -- why would he put oatmeal there? -- he's constantly buildi...

At this age, your baby's social circle isn't very large. Of all of the friends, relatives, and strangers who drift in and out of her life, she really only cares about a few key people. And you're one of them. Throughout the day, she'll make many attempts to get your attention and draw you into her world. Yelling may be one of her favorite tactics. When she screams for attention, the best thing y...

Your 6-month-old still has a limited social life. He can recognize his mom and dad, and he enjoys it when someone plays with him or talks to him. But at this age, he doesn't give much thought to other people. His notion of "love" may be primitive, but he still needs plenty of it. You should comfort him when he cries and give him lots of cuddles. At this age, it's impossible to spoil him. He just...

Your baby is on the verge of a scientific breakthrough. After many experiments, he's starting to realize that his actions have consequences. When he hits his mobile, it moves. When he lets go of his rattle, it falls. And when he cries, mom comforts him. He's learning that life isn't quite as random as it seemed. More important, he's learning that he has some control over his world. He's especial...

Your baby loves to move. It's almost as if she still remembers her cramped quarters from a few months ago and is making the most of her newfound freedom. She can get a surprising amount of exercise while lying on her back. Put her down on her blanket, and she'll probably kick and flap as if trying to take flight. She's not getting very far, but her excited squeals tell you she's having a great t...

Your baby lives in a perplexing world, but some things are coming into focus. New research has shown that your baby now has 20/60 vision, although his brain isn't able to process all of its visual information yet. For the first time, his eyes are working together, giving him the gift of depth perception. Now when he reaches for a toy, he's less likely to miss by a mile. His eyes can also track mov...

Your baby may spend a lot of time looking pensive, but she's not exactly a deep thinker. When she furrows her brow and purses her lips, she's more likely to be filling her pants than doing algebra. Still, she's starting to take some amazing mental leaps. For the first time, she's beginning to understand the wonders of cause and effect. She'll start to realize that her crib shakes when she kicks ...

Your baby's mind is becoming as active as his body. He's having important insights about himself, the people around him, and his surroundings. He's smart enough to remember the past and anticipate the future. He's also smart enough to feel bored and lonely. He shouldn't be left alone in his crib or playpen for more than a half-hour at a time. He needs regular opportunities to move around, play wit...

By now, your baby is moving towards all sorts of fun and mischief. Different babies have different methods for getting around. Some scoot on their bellies, some use their arms to push themselves backwards, and some have already mastered the classic forward crawl. However your baby decides to crawl, she needs your help to polish her skills, have fun, and stay safe. Watch her face as she works on ...

Your baby is full of emotions, and he's more than willing to put them on display. He can go from laughter to tears and back again faster than you can change his clothes. Dealing with his up-and-down feelings can be a tiring job, but there's an upside: If you don't like his attitude, just wait a few minutes. He'll soon have a new one. The more time you spend with your child, the happier he'll be....

Your baby's curiosity dwarfs her attention span. She'll be fascinated by just about everything -- for a little while, at least. She'll move from a toy to a book to another toy like a baby on a mission. She's trying to make sense of the things around her, and she's learning every day. Few missions in life are more important. Your baby may have a thirst for learning, but it's probably too early to...

At this age, your baby needs love about as much as he needs food. Your hugs, cuddles, and kind words are crucial for his physical, intellectual, and emotional growth. He knows it, too. Why else would he try so hard to win your affection? More than ever before, your baby really aims to please. He'll enjoy showing off new skills, and he'll beam with happiness when you say "way to go" or "good job....

Your baby continues to add new moves to his repertoire. He may now be able to crawl while holding something in his hand, opening up brand-new opportunities to put things where they don't belong. He might be able to spin around on his bottom, a move he'll practice over and over. He might also be able to stand briefly if you hold his hand. At his age, standing is usually exciting business. He'll c...

Gaga. Mama. Baba. Listening to a baby talk at this age is a bit like searching for diamonds in a rock pile. Real words will be surrounded by nonsense syllables. And even when you hear a word, it's hard to tell if he really means it. He may say "no" when he's thinking "yes," and he may say "mama" for absolutely no reason at all. He's still figuring out what his mouth can do. You should keep encoura...

Your baby's social life is getting more complex as the months go by. She's growing more aware of the people around her, and she's also starting to think about her place in the world. For her, a little awareness can be a confusing thing. As she sorts through new anxieties and conflicting emotions, she'll need your love and support as much as ever before. By the 10th month, she may have already en...

Your baby's social life is growing richer and more complicated. She's really starting to see herself as an individual, a realization that will only feed her hunger for independence. She's also paying more attention to the different people around her. She can instantly separate the familiar faces from the strangers, a skill that may cause anxiety when out-of-town relatives stop by for a visit. Whil...

Your baby understands quite a bit by now -- probably a lot more than he shows. He's well acquainted with the word "no" -- although he doesn't necessarily obey it! He recognizes his name and turns when he hears it. He can also recognize familiar voices, even on the telephone. He usually responds with body language to familiar questions, such as "Do you want up?" He may be able to follow simple, f...

As you prepare for your child's first birthday, it's only natural to wonder about other milestones. If she isn't already walking, you may worry that she's falling behind schedule. You may have heard about nieces, cousins, or neighbor kids who toddled their way through their first birthday party. But don't be concerned if your little one is still content to crawl and scoot. Only about half of all b...

In the sixth month, your baby will continue exploring some of the basic laws of physics. Water spills, plates fall, and mom and dad make funny noises when something really messy hits the floor. Games of "cause and effect" may not be good for your carpeting, but they work wonders for her brain. She's learning that she has some control over the world, and she's beginning to understand that actions h...

The sixth month is a time for breakthroughs and discoveries. Your baby will develop skills that will open a new world of opportunities: opportunities to move, opportunities to learn, and, yes, opportunities to cause trouble. As she's testing her newfound abilities, you'll be put to the test, too. You need to encourage and challenge her, but you also need to keep her safe. This is the age when ma...

At this age, your baby likes to socialize through play. Games are a great way to bring out her personality and strengthen your bond. When you play with her, you're telling her that she matters. You're also reminding her that you're more than just a servant or a disciplinarian. You're a person who knows how to have fun. Your baby's favorite games are the classics played by generations of other ki...

How much sleep does my child need? It depends on her age and other personal characteristics. According to the Nemours Foundation, which specializes in children's health issues, a 3-month old will sleep an average of 15 hours a day. This gradually decreases as a child grows older, eventually gives up daily naps and sleeps progressively fewer hours at night. Here are a few rough guidelines from the...

Even when your newborn seems to just be staring into space, she is actually working overtime on developing her mind. In the first year of life, the brain will double in size and your child will make amazing cognitive leaps. The brain is made up of neurons, nerve cells resembling long wires. A newborn's brain has few connections between the neurons, but your baby is busily making new ones in resp...

Your baby has a lot to think about during her second month. When will she get fed? What are those shapes dangling above her crib? Who are those people who keep picking her up, and why do they make such strange sounds? Understanding language is one of your baby's most important jobs in the first few years of life. Believe it or not, she's already starting to polish her skills. Her communication h...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in ways that are defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous, you want to show him that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it also delivers other messages you don't want to be sent:

During the second month, your baby becomes a much more interactive little being. This is the month when the long-anticipated first smile emerges. Not a mere flutter during sleep, this is a true grin that conveys her amusement at your antics or joy upon seeing you. In fact, her entire face gets in on the action, eyes twinkling and chubby cheeks dimpling. To keep those adorable, toothless smiles c...

How important is it to teach my child good manners? These are the years when your child needs to learn the true meaning of good manners: that if she conducts herself considerately in all sorts of different situations, from visits with relatives to overnights with friends, people will enjoy -- and even seek out -- her company. Even a 6-year-old can grasp the idea that different scenarios call for...

Child abuse casts a long shadow. A long-term study published in the Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect found that by age 21, up to 80 percent of child abuse survivors had developed a psychiatric illness, including depression and anxiety disorders. In recent years, experts have discovered another disturbing consequence of childhood trauma: People who were abused or neglected as children also appea...

What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder? ADHD (commonly known as ADD) is a behavioral disorder. Basically, kids who have it are unable to concentrate, extremely restless, or both. The American Psychiatric Association calls the distinct types "inattentive" and "hyperactive-impulsivity." Some adolescents with attention deficit disorder can't organize or complete tasks, get distracted easil...

How can I get my child to stop whining? A school-age child who whines can be a serious nuisance and may earn a reputation as a complainer at school. Ending the habit isn't easy. Find the patience and resolution to help your child by reminding yourself how important it is for him to behave in likable and effective ways. You have two main tasks: to firmly refuse to give in to his needling and to te...

How can I get my child to stop whining? That depends on why he's whining. If he's hungry, tired, or bored, give him what he needs: a snack, a nap, a suggestion of something to do, or maybe just a hug. Then you can deal with curbing his fussy behavior and preventing it in the future. Suppose your child is whining for something he shouldn't have. Try these tips:

We were listening to a tape of the most recent Harry Potter volume, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, on the way back from the beach, my three children and I. It was late, and everyone was sunburned and sandy, stunned into peaceful silence. The car was warm and rapt, and no one said a word as we hurtled down the highway, over the Golden Gate Bridge and across the city to our house. The ...

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